Appendices – Congress Planning Guidelines

APPENDIX A1

                               
Society for Range Management

ANNUAL MEETING WORK SCHEDULE TIMELINE

TASKS	RESPONSIBILITY	MONTHS OUT
Request for bids sent to all Sections in Region rotation from Headquarters
	Director of Meetings (DM)	59 (MAR)
Deadline for receipt of Section bids to Headquarters	Section Officers	57 
(MAY)
Request for Proposals (RFPs) sent to selected cities	DM	56 (JUN)
Deadline for receipt of RFPs to Headquarters		54 (AUG)
Schedule site inspections/negotiate rates	DM/Section Reps	53-51 (SEP-NOV)
Select site and prepare Advisory Council presentation for next Annual Meeting
	DM/Section Reps	50 (DEC)
Board approval of meeting location @ Annual Meeting	SRM Board	48 (FEB)
Complete negotiations to finalize hotel/convention center contracts & have 
signed by Executive Vice President	DM/EVP	47-45 (MAR-MAY)
Select and appoint the Annual Meeting Planning Committee (AMPC) General Co-
Chairs	Section Officers	44 (JUN)
Select and/or appoint all AMPC Chairs	General Co-Chairs (GCC)	43 (JUL)
Select basic members of all committees	GCC/Committee Chairs	42 (AUG)
Hold 1st AMPC meeting at selected site to inspect and evaluate facilities; 
select theme & logo; finalize committee appointment; begin plan of work
	AMPC	33-32 (MAY-JUN)
Begin budget preparations for the meeting.	GCC/Finance Chairs	30 (AUG)
Assign use of space and equipment by half-day periods during the meeting.	
	22 (APR)
Plan the publicity notices for each specific audience. Schedule dates for 
each notice. Decide on use of pre-meeting Trail Boss News. Prepare notices on 
time. Prepare a budget.		AMD-36
Collect needed information for notices in Rangelands. Prepare and submit 
texts ahead of deadline dates, as shown for completion of tasks.		AMD-6
Arrange and direct all local publicity in the various media.	
	PUSPAMD-0
Determine the exhibit spaces available for commercial booths and for other 
displays. Assign uses of spaces.		EXLRAMD-7
Plan the advertising sales campaign, assign responsibilities, and carry out 
the program.		ADSPAMD-0
Prepare the "Registration Form".		
Record the pre-registration data, plan and supervise operation of the 
Registration Desk.		AMD-0
Prepare a summary of registration numbers and income.		AMD+2
Block hotel rooms for SRM use.		
Negotiate hotel room rates.		AMD-47
Develop a detailed time schedule for all phases of the meeting, including 
technical sessions, general session, awards ceremonies, membership meeting, 
SRM business functions, and workshops.		GECHAMD-36
Decide the meeting "Theme" and develop the General (Plenary) Session. Select 
the featured speakers and arrange for their attendance.		PRCH, 
GECHAMD-36
Plan the Student Sessions.		AMD-23
Plan the SRM business functions.		GECHAMD-12
Submit "Call for Papers" to Trail Boss News."		PRCHAMD-12
Receive, review and approve abstracts from authors.		AMD-6
Appoint Session Chairs.		AMD-6
Prepare "Abstracts" in final form for printing.		PRCH    AMD-4
Assemble all signs, equipment, and other materials needed for session 
operations.		AMD-2
Assign personnel for program operation, train them, and supervise the 
operations.		SODR, PRCHAMD-0
Supervise operation of the workshops and SRM business functions.	
	SODRAMD-0
Plan the overall hospitality effort. Appoint assistant as needed.	
	AMD-36
For each host event - entertainment features, spouse events, student events, 
field tours, and shuttle service - prepare a detailed plan. Arrange for 
facilities, meals, and entertainers; describe each event; determine ticket 
costs; arrange contracts with commercial companies; obtain needed decoration, 
"favors," etc. Prepare an operating budget for each function. Recruit 
assistants as needed.		AMD-36
Check all contracts with commercial companies for host events. Provide needed 
advance payments.		
Assign available personnel to the various host functions, and direct the 
overall hospitality effort.		AMD-0
Provide the needed handout material. Oversee operation of the various 
"desks," the shuttle buses, the spouse buses, and the field tour buses.	
	AMD-0
Prepare a brief report of the meeting. Include statements on major successes 
and/or problems, and suggested handbook changes. Give facts and figures on 
subjects, such as advertising sales, hotel room blocking and actual use, 
registration numbers and income, ticket sales, and the estimated budget and 
actual expenses.		GECHAMD+4

APPENDIX A2

WORK SCHEDULE TIMELINE

TASKS, RESPONSIBLE PERSONS, DEADLINES

This schedule will be needed at all times by the Chairs responsible for 
continuous monitoring of progress on all tasks. And all members of the Annual 
Meeting Committee must check the schedule to determine their specific 
assigned tasks and deadline dates.

Each task must be assigned well ahead of the date when an initial plan is 
due. Early review of the plan must be scheduled - to allow adequate time for 
needed revisions ahead of the deadline date for completion of the task. The 
planning Team will help make the reviews and revisions.

TASKS	PROPOSAL	COMPLETION
Select convention city.	Section, SRM Planner AMD-58	Council, Board AMD-48
Contract for facilities. Check and list all to be provided each half-day of 
the meeting.	Host Section, SRM Planner AMD-48	SRM PlannerAMD-47
Select and appoint the General Chairs (GECH).	Host Section AMD-45	SRM 
PlannerAMD-44
Select and/or appoint all Co-Chairs.	GECH      AMD-44	SRM Planner AMD-43
Select basic members of the Annual Meeting Committee.	Co-ChairsAMD-43
	GECHAMD-42
Keep membership informed of Annual Meeting plans.	PublicityAMD-36	AMD-0
Inspect and evaluate facilities. Determine adequacy for each half-day period.
	Annual Meeting CommitteeAMD-45	AMD-30
Prepare an overall plan for the meeting.	Planning TeamAMD-43	AMD-36
Prepare an overall budget for the meeting.	GECH, FIOFAMD-36	GECH, FIOFAMD-30
Prepare a financial summary.	SRM PlannerAMD+2	
Assign use of space and equipment by half-day periods during the meeting.
	PRCHAMD-23	AMD-22
Maintain contacts with SRM Officers, SRM Committees, and other groups needing 
space for offices, workshops, and meetings. Request their early inputs. Keep 
them informed of assigned spaces.	AMD-43	AMD-23
Plan the publicity notices for each specific audience. Schedule dates for 
each notice. Decide on use of pre-meeting Trail Boss News. Prepare notices on 
time. Prepare a budget.	AMD-36	AMD-36
Collect needed information for notices in Rangelands. Prepare and submit 
texts ahead of deadline dates, as shown for completion of tasks.	AMD-18
	AMD-6
Arrange and direct all local publicity in the various media.	PUSPAMD-18
	PUSPAMD-0
Determine the exhibit spaces available for commercial booths and for other 
displays. Assign uses of spaces.	EXLRAMD-45	EXLRAMD-7
Plan the advertising sales campaign, assign responsibilities, and carry out 
the program.	ADSPAMD-43	ADSPAMD-0
Prepare the "Registration Form".	SRM PlannerAMD-18	
Record the pre-registration data, plan and supervise operation of the 
Registration Desk.	SRM PlannerAMD-79	AMD-0
Prepare a summary of registration numbers and income.	SRM Planner, FIOFAMD+1
	AMD+2
Block hotel rooms for SRM use.	SRM Planner AMD-47	
Negotiate hotel room rates.	SRM PlannerAMD-58	AMD-47
Develop a detailed time schedule for all phases of the meeting, including 
technical sessions, general session, awards ceremonies, membership meeting, 
SRM business functions, and workshops.	Planning TeamAMD-43	GECHAMD-36
Decide the meeting "Theme" and develop the General (Plenary) Session. Select 
the featured speakers and arrange for their attendance.	PRCHAMD-43	PRCH, 
GECHAMD-36
Plan the Student Sessions.	SRM Student Affairs CommitteeAMD-43	AMD-23
Plan the SRM business functions.	EVPAMD-43	GECHAMD-12
Submit "Call for Papers" to Trail Boss News."	PRCHAMD-14	PRCHAMD-12
Receive, review and approve abstracts from authors.	PRCH AMD-8	AMD-6
Appoint Session Chairs.	PRCH AMD-8	AMD-6
Prepare "Abstracts" in final form for printing.	PRCH    AMD-5	PRCH    AMD-
4
Assemble all signs, equipment, and other materials needed for session 
operations.	SODRAMD-78	AMD-2
Assign personnel for program operation, train them, and supervise the 
operations.	SODRAMD-46	SODR, PRCHAMD-0
Supervise operation of the workshops and SRM business functions.	
	SODRAMD-0
Plan the overall hospitality effort. Appoint assistant as needed.
	HPLRAMD-43	AMD-36
For each host event - entertainment features, spouse events, student events, 
field tours, and shuttle service - prepare a detailed plan. Arrange for 
facilities, meals, and entertainers; describe each event; determine ticket 
costs; arrange contracts with commercial companies; obtain needed decoration, 
"favors," etc. Prepare an operating budget for each function. Recruit 
assistants as needed.	HPLRAMD-43	AMD-36
Check all contracts with commercial companies for host events. Provide needed 
advance payments.	FIOFAMD-36	
Assign available personnel to the various host functions, and direct the 
overall hospitality effort.	HPLRAMD-20	AMD-0
Provide the needed handout material. Oversee operation of the various 
"desks," the shuttle buses, the spouse buses, and the field tour buses.
	HPLRAMD-8	AMD-0
Prepare a brief report of the meeting. Include statements on major successes 
and/or problems, and suggested handbook changes. Give facts and figures on 
subjects, such as advertising sales, hotel room blocking and actual use, 
registration numbers and income, ticket sales, and the estimated budget and 
actual expenses.	GECHAMD+1	GECHAMD+4

APPENDIX B

Society for Range Management
PROPERTY INFORMATION REQUEST

Property Name												
Contact Person												
Physical Address												

Mailing Address												

Phone				  Fax				  Email					
Web site													
Property Information (complete all that apply)
Year Property Built			No. of Floors		No. Rooms		No. 
Suites	
No. Non-Smoking Rooms	     	No. Disability Accessible Rooms	
Last Year of Guest Room Renovation			Last Year of Public Space 
Renovation		
Any Planned Renovation										

Type of Property  (check all that apply)
q  All Suites	q  Corporate Transient	    q  Meeting/Convention		q  
Resort
q  Extended Stay/Residential	q  Conference Center	    q  Full Service	
	q  Limited Service
Market Tier
q  Luxury	q  Upscale	q  Moderate	q  Economy	q  Budget
Property Location
q  Airport	q  Rural		q  Suburban	q  Downtown/City Center	q  
Resort
Property Ownership & Management (check all that apply)
Chain owned:	q  Yes	q  No		If no, name of owners				

Management Company											
Franchise:	q  Yes	q  No
AAA Diamond	1     2     3     4     5     Not rated
Mobil Stars	1     2     3     4     5     Not rated
Other ratings (specify)										

Transportation & Parking (complete all that apply)
Airport #1
Name										3-Letter Code		
Distance from property (miles)	     Travel time/Rush hour		     Travel 
time/Non-rush hour		
Complimentary shuttle:	q  Yes	q  No		Estimated Cost for Taxi 
(each way)		
Alternative mode of transportation							Cost 
each way		
Driving directions											

Parking spaces at property			Charges for: 	Self-parking		
	Valet		
Taxes, Service and/or Gratuity Charges (check all that apply)
Current room tax is 	% plus $		 occupancy tax.  There currently  q is
	 q is not a ballot initiative in the next election to raise that tax.
There is a   q  gratuity   q  service charge of           % on group food & 
beverage.  This is taxed at           %
Facilities/Services on Property (check all that apply)
q	Cocktail Lounge	
q	24-hour Room Service or q  Room service start time                  end 
time               	
q	Safety Deposit Boxes/Lobby Area
q	Express Check In/Out
q	Video Review Check Out
q	Full Business Center        Hours	a.m. to 	       p.m.     q  M - 
F	q  7 Days/Week
q	Gift Shop/Newsstand       Hours	a.m. to 	       p.m.     q  M - F	q  
7 Days/Week	
q	Full Service Health Club     Hours	a.m. to 	       p.m.     q  M - 
F	q  7 Days/Week
q	Laundry/Valet Service (check appropriate responses)
q  On-property   q  Sent out	Circle service:   5 days/week     6 
days/week     7 days/week     Overnight
q	Shoe Shine Service
q	Swimming Pool
q  Indoor   q  Outdoor
q	Airline Desk(s)	Please specify:			, 			, 		

q	Car Rental Desk(s)     Please specify:			, 			, 

q	ATM	(Use fee is $	)
q	Evening Turndown Service
q  All Guests   q  VIPs only
q	Golf Course
q	Tennis Courts
q	Racquet Ball Courts
q	Other 												

Guest Rooms (check all that apply)
q	Safe
q	Working desks with outlets above floor
q	Voice Mail	q  Personalized Voice Mail	
q	Two-line phones/All Rooms     q  Two-line Phones/Concierge or 
Specialized rooms only	
q	Data Ports on all phones	q  Digital or analog phone lines
q	Phone in bathroom/All Rooms     q  Phone in bathroom/Concierge or 
Specialized rooms only
q	Access Charges:
q  Local Phone Calls   q  Toll-free Calls
q	AM/FM Radio
q  with cassette player   q  with CD player
q	Color TV          q  Remote control TV         q  Cable/Satellite TV
q	All news cable channel          q  Weather channel         q  Other 
special channels				
q	In-room movies on demand
q	In-room VCR
q	Iron/ironing Board
q	Mini-bar		q Refrigerator
q	Coffee/Tea Maker	q  Daily complimentary coffee/tea
q	Free Daily newspaper delivered to room
Reservations & Check In/Out (check all that apply)
q	Reservations may be made through toll-free number.  That number is 	

q	Toll-free number is accessible throughout U.S.
q	Toll-free number to residents of same state.  That number is 		

q	Number for those outside the U.S.  That number is 			
q	TTY/TDD number.  That number is 				
q	Fax number for reservations.  That number is 			
q	Reservations may be made on-line at http://www.					
	 or via
Email to 											
q	All rooms in a group's room block are released to the toll-free number.
q	The property has an in-house reservations department.
q	The reservations department is located off-site.
q	Check-in time is 			Check-out time is 		

Safety & Security (check all that apply)
q	Smoke detectors in all guest rooms	Hardwired?     q  Yes     q  No	
q	Smoke detectors in hallways		Hardwired?     q  Yes     q  No	
q	Smoke detectors in public areas	Hardwired?     q  Yes     q  No	
q	Audible smoke detectors
q	Visual alarms for hearing impaired
q	Sprinklers in all guest rooms
q	Sprinklers in hallways
q	Sprinklers in public areas
q	Fire extinguishers in hallways
q	Automatic fire doors
q	Auto link to fire station
q	Auto recall elevators
q	Ventilated stairwells
q	Emergency maps in guest rooms/hallways
q	Emergency information in all guest rooms
q	Emergency lighting
q	Safety chain on doors
q	Doors with view ports (peep holes)
q	Deadbolts on all guest room doors
q	Restricted access to guest room floors
q	Property has defibrillators
q	Staff trained to use defibrillators	How many per shift		
q	Staff trained in CPR	How many per shift		
q	Staff trained in first aid	How many per shift		
q	Secondary locks on guest room glass doors
q	Room balconies accessible by adjoining rooms/balconies
q	Primary guest room entrance accessible by interior corridor/atrium
q	Guest room accessible by exterior entrance only
q	Guest room windows open
q	Uniformed security
q	24-hour security throughout hotel	Number of staff		
q	Public address system
q	Video surveillance in public areas/elevators
q	Video surveillance at entrances
q	Video surveillance in hallways
q	Staff trained in issuance of duplicate keys/cards
q	Emergency power source									

q	SOPs for power outages									

q	Emergency call response time in minutes to your property			

q	Does property have an emergency evacuation plan 	q  Yes	q  No
q	How often does property conduct emergency evacuation drills			

q	Nearest police stations (blocks/miles)						

q	Does hotel comply with all Country/State/Local fire laws	q  Yes	q  
No
Non-U.S. hotels please complete the following:
q	Address of American Embassy in your city/country					

q	Phone number for American Embassy							

Staff and Staffing (check all that apply)
q	Average length of employment at this property:
Management staff 		 years		Line staff 		 years
q	Staff organized for purpose of collective bargaining.  (Please list 
unions and staff positions, contract renewal dates on separate sheet.)
Policies and Miscellaneous Charges (check all that apply)
q	Credit cards are charged when reservation is made.
q	Guest may cancel guaranteed reservations without penalty charge
q  to 4 p.m. day of arrival   q  to 6 p.m. day of arrival     q  24 hours   q  
48 hours     q  72 hours   
q  Other 											
q	Guest substitutions q are   q are not  allowed without penalty to group 
and/or individual.
q	Extended stays (based on availability) are allowed at no additional 
charge.
q	The property charges $	 per page for receipt of faxes.
q	The property charges $	 per page to send faxes.
q	The property charges $	 for delivery of packages.
q	The property charges $	 for property to send packages.
q	The property charges $	 to deliver packages to individual or group.
q	If a resort, a resort fee of $		 is charges which covers:		

q	The property does charge an energy surcharge of $	 per room per 
night.  This charge q is q is not taxed.

Environmental Issues (check all that apply)
q	Our property recycles the following materials:
q  Papers   q  Plastic     q  Metals
q	Our property provides a way for guests to recycle.
q	We ask guests to use their towels and/or have their beds changed every 
other day.
q	Other areas we protect the environment are:						

Other Groups (check all that apply)
q	During the group's preferred dates, the other events confirmed in the 
city are:													

q	During the group's preferred dates, the other events confirmed in the 
property are:												

City/County Labor Issues
q	Note any groups organized for the purpose of collective bargaining in 
the city or county whose contract deadlines are two (2) months on either side 
of the preferred dates, and their history of labor actions:				

Audio Visual Equipment (check all that apply)
q	The in-house or recommended company is 						

q	The facility has the ability to negotiate prices on behalf of the A/V 
company.	q Yes      q No
q	A discount of 	% off list prices can be offered for A/V equipment for 
the meeting.
q	The service charge is 	%.  It q is q is not taxed.  If yes, at 	
	%.
q	If an outside A/V company is used, the property q does q does not charge 
a fee.  This fee is $		.
Operations and Technology (check all that apply)
q	Our sales/convention services staff use 			 word processing 
software, Version		
q	Sales and convention services personnel use email.	q Yes      q No
Email addresses are:
q	Sales										
q	Convention/Catering Services							
q	Reservations									
q	Sales and convention services have web access.		q Yes      q No
q	Reservations are fully automates and can respond by email.	q Yes      q 
No
q	Our web site address is									
q	Group/meeting reservations can be made on line.		q Yes      q No

Form completed by: 										
Signature

Printed Name/Title										

Phone:			     Fax: 			     Email					

PLEASE MAIL COMPLETED FORM WITH PROPOSAL TO:

Ann M. Harris
Director of Administration/Programs
Society for Range Management
445 Union Blvd., Suite 230
Lakewood, CO  80228-1259

APPENDIX C

Site Inspection Checklist
Hotel Name:												

Address/City/State/Zip:										

Contact:						  Phone:				  Email:	

Rate the PRODUCT:Physical Plant	Rate the PRODUCT:Policies & Procedures
	Rate the PEOPLE	Requirements SPECIFIC to our needs:
q  Appearance, renovations? planned?	q  Porterage fee:	q  Appearance, 
renovations? planned?	q
q  Lighting, ventilation	q  Parking fee or free?	q  Appearance, 
renovations? planned?	q
q  Condition of elevators	q  Early arrival check-in?	q  Appearance, 
renovations? planned?	q
q  Accessibility (general & ADA)	q  "Green" policies	q  Appearance, 
renovations? planned?	q
q  Sleeping room configurations	q  A/V equipment: internal or external?	q  
Appearance, renovations? planned?	q
q  Overall cleanliness	q  Property technologically equipped?	q  
Appearance, renovations? planned?	q
q  Restaurant(s) on site?	q  Technology available & useful	q  Appearance, 
renovations? planned?	q
q  Meeting space accessibility/location	q  Room service hours:	q  
Appearance, renovations? planned?	q
q  Separate registration area	q  Food & beverage: variety	q  Appearance, 
renovations? planned?	q
q  Break areas	q  Food & beverage: pricing	q  Appearance, renovations? 
Planned?	q
q  Sound/lighting/electrical outlets	q  Liquor service: insured/trained	q  
Appearance, renovations? planned?	q
q  Sound proofing	q  Fees for fitness center:	q  Appearance, renovations? 
planned?	q
q  Storage	q  Staff training: issuance of keys	q  Appearance, renovations? 
planned?	q
q  Restroom locations	q  Safety training: fire/first aid/CPR?	q  
Appearance, renovations? planned?	q
q  Storage capabilities	q  Union property: Yes/No	q  Appearance, 
renovations? planned?	q
q  Capacities/dimensions of space	q  Front office staffing policies	q  
Appearance, renovations? planned?	q
q  Overall safety/security	q  Housekeeping staffing policies	q  
Appearance, renovations? planned?	q
q  Guest room safety/security	q  Oversold policies	q  Appearance, 
renovations? planned?	q
q  Emergency power sources	q  Credit card policies	q  Appearance, 
renovations? planned?	q
q  Smoke detectors/sprinklers	q  Other groups booked: hotel/city	q  
Appearance, renovations? planned?	q
q  Outlets/recreational opportunities	q  Risk management policies	q  
Appearance, renovations? planned?	q
q  Parking	q  Credit policies	q  Appearance, renovations? planned?	q
q  Airport transportation	q  Current taxes/surcharges/extra fees	q  
Appearance, renovations? planned?	q

APPENDIX D

AGREEMENT
BETWEEN
"HOTEL"
AND
SOCIETY FOR RANGE MANAGEMENT
"AMYear" ANNUAL MEETING

INTRODUCTION

The following terms and conditions will serve as the agreement between the 
Society for Range Management (hereinafter referred to as "SRM") and the 
"Hotel" (hereinafter referred to as "Hotel") for the "AMYear" Annual Meeting 
(hereinafter referred to as the "Event").

SRM desired to engage the facilities and services of the Hotel and Hotel 
agrees to furnish facilities and services as stated in this Agreement to 
accommodate SRM for the Event.

When signed by authorized representatives of both parties, this Agreement 
will constitute a firm contract between SRM and Hotel.  Any changes to this 
Agreement must be made in writing and signed by authorized representatives of 
both parties.

EVENT DATES

Hotel agrees to hold the following dates on a definite basis for the Event:

"MtgDates"

ROOM BLOCK

Hotel has reserved the following sleeping rooms for the event:

DAY	FRI	SAT	SUN	MON	TUE	WED	THU	FRI	SAT	TOTAL
DATE										
BLOCK										

SRM will be due damages equal to the group's average room rate on the number 
of rooms taken away prior to the cutoff date.  If the Hotel does not provide 
70 percent of the contracted room block, SRM may terminate its obligations to 
the Hotel without liability and hold the Hotel liable for breach of contract.

SRM has the right to cancel this Agreement if the Hotel goes into bankruptcy 
or creditor reorganization.

GROUP RATES

The sleeping room rates stated below are guaranteed rates for the dates of 
the meeting in "AMYear".  These rates will apply three days prior and three 
day immediately following the actual meeting dates.

"MtgDates"

All rates are subject to applicable city and state taxes at the time of 
arrival; currently "LocalTax".

SLEEPING ROOM RESERVATION PROCEDURES

Reservations and rooming lists should be directed to the attention of the 
Hotel's Housing Directors, at: Phone: "Ph"; Fax: "Fax" or Email: "Email".  
Individuals reservations can be made directly with the Hotel's Reservation 
Department.  For SRM's convenience, and 800 number has been established for 
guest reservations at (800) "M_800".

Hotel agrees to send, at no charge, a confirmation of reservations and/or 
reservation changes to each registered guest within seven (7) days of receipt 
of such information.

Name changes to room reservations may be made prior to arrival at no charge, 
provided there is no change to arrival and departure dates.

A deposit equal to one night's stay is required to hold each individual's 
reservation after 6:00 p.m. on the night of arrival.  Personal check, money 
order, or valid MasterCard, Visa, American Express, Diners Club, Discover or 
Carte Blanche card number and expiration date are acceptable.  Should a guest 
cancel a reservation, the deposit will be refunded if notice is received at 
least two (2) business days prior to arrival, and a cancellation number is 
obtained.  SRM is not responsible for any individual sleeping room charges 
unless agreed upon prior to the Event by SRM.

CHECK IN/CHECK OUT

Check in time is 3:00 p.m.  Individuals may be checked in earlier depending 
on occupancy levels and availability of "ready" rooms.  Check out time is 
1:00 p.m.

Hotel agrees to hold the block of rooms specified in this agreement until 
"RmBlkEndDate".  At that time, rooms not covered by a rooming list or 
individual reservations will be released for sale by Hotel.  Hotel will 
continue to accept reservations from attendees after this date subject to 
availability, at group rates.  Any reservation accepted for the Event after 
the cut-off date will be credited to the overall room usage.

REVIEW OF ROOM BLOCK

Prior to the Event, SRM and the Hotel reserve the right to renegotiate the 
room block.

RESERVATIONS/"WALKING"

If the reservations are not honored:

1.	Obligation of the Hotel to obtain, at no charge to the walked guest, a 
room at an equivalent or better hotel (based on an independent rating system 
such as the AAA or Mobile Guide) in the closest possible proximity.
2.	Obligation to continue such arrangements for each night the guest's 
reservation is not honored.
3.	Obligation to provide at no cost or to reimburse for transportation 
to/from the substitute hotel and functions and the reserved hotel on demand.
4.	Letter of apology from the general manager and an in-room amenity.
5.	If the reserved room becomes available after more than two (2) days, the 
walked guest reserves the right to stay at the substitute hotel or go to the 
guaranteed property at no cost.
6.	An additional complimentary room night will be credited to the SRM 
Master Account to compensate for the disruption of the meeting caused by the 
failure to provide the guaranteed room.
7.	The Hotel, if aware of a potential need to walk attendees, is to notify 
SRM as soon as possible to discuss alternatives and other particulars (i.e., 
who must not be walked under any circumstances).

When guests leave early, Hotel may charge an early departure fee.  At check-
in, guests may be asked to confirm the date of departure.  At that point, 
they are also informed that if they leave earlier, they must pay a fee.  This 
becomes a contract between the Hotel and the individual guest.

In the event of a no-show, the Hotel will retain the first night's room 
deposit.

When a guest stays beyond the scheduled departure, the Hotel may be empowered 
to change the rate for the room or even evict the hotel from the room.

COMPLIMENTARY ROOM POLICY

One (1) sleeping room will be provided on a complimentary basis for every 40 
sleeping rooms occupied on a cumulative basis to be calculated on the Event's 
total room nights and divided by 40.  Complimentary rooms may be used during 
the actual event dates, or unutilized rooms may be credited to the SRM Master 
Account at the single room rate, exclusive of any tax, service or other 
charges, at the option of SRM.

At SRM's request, Hotel's in-house guest list will be compared with SRM's 
registration list.  Any guest room occupied by an individual on SRM's 
registration list, but not coded to SRM within the Hotel's system, will be 
credited to SRM's room pickup.  Hotel staff may compare the lists or permit 
an SRM representative to do so.  In the latter case, SRM will maintain the 
confidentiality of such list.

SPECIAL CONSIDERATIONS

Hotel agrees to offer the following during the meeting dates:

1.	Complimentary Airport Shuttle
2.	Complimentary Valet and Self-Parking
3.	Complimentary First Class Health Facilities
4.	Complimentary Presidential Suite
5.	Three (3) Complimentary One Bedroom Suites

In addition, Hotel will provide 20 complimentary single rooms for use over 
the course of planning the meeting from  through .

REPORT OF EVENT

Hotel agrees to provide a full report of the Event to SRM within thirty (30) 
days after the conclusion of the event.  This report will include, but will 
not be limited to, room pick-up, cancellations and no-show count.

MEETING/BANQUET SPACE REQUIREMENTS

All meeting room space will be held for SRM during the dates of "MtgDates".  
Final agenda is due six months prior to the Event, after which unassigned 
space will be released to the Hotel.

CATERING

There will be no special labor or service fee(s) for any SRM food and/or 
beverage function.  Attached as Appendix A are Hotel's food and beverage 
prices in effect for the dates of the meeting.

MEETING ROOM RENTAL CHARGE

The meeting and banquet space as outlined in this Agreement will be 
complimentary, including all exhibit booth space.

EXHIBITOR CONTRACT

A copy of SRM's proposed exhibitor's contract must be submitted to Hotel's 
Convention Services Department prior to its printing and distribution, to 
ensure that the Hotel is protected and that exhibitors have received complete 
information and instructions, as well as rules and regulations governing 
exhibits at the Hotel.  The exhibitors contract must include the following 
"Hold Harmless Clause":

"The exhibitor assumes the entire responsibility and liability for losses, 
damages, and claims arising out of exhibitor's activities on the Hotel 
premises and will indemnify, defend and hold harmless the Hotel, its agents, 
servants and employees from any and all such losses, damages and claims."

Hotel will not be responsible or liable for any loss, damage or claims 
arising out of exhibitor's activities on the Hotel premises except any 
claims, loss, or damages arising directly from its negligence.

AUDIO-VISUAL SERVICES

Audio-visual equipment contracted through the Hotel will be in the meeting 
room and operative at the start of the meeting, or the rental charge will be 
waived.

FOOD/ALCOHOL

The Hotel will allow SRM to bring in donated agricultural products for 
special events.

SECURITY

Should SRM require security, the Hotel's Convention Services Department will 
assist in securing these arrangements.

CREDIT ARRANGEMENTS

In order to establish credit with Hotel for the purpose of direct billing SRM 
shall complete the credit application form enclosed.  This application must 
be completed and returned to the Hotel Credit Manager, no later than 90 days 
prior to the event.

Any remaining balance on the Master Account will be due upon receipt of an 
invoice from Hotel.  In the event that any charges remain unpaid after thirty 
(30) days from the date of invoice, SRM agrees to pay Hotel a late payment 
penalty equal to 1-1/2% per month on the remaining balance until paid in 
full.

MASTER ACCOUNT

Hotel must be notified in writing at least thirty (30) days prior to arrival 
of the authorized signatures and the charges that are to be posted to the 
Master Account.

CANCELLATION	

If SRM cancels the Event or moves the Event to another city or facility, such 
decision shall constitute a breach of its obligation to Hotel.  Should the 
event not be held at Hotel or be cancelled, SRM will pay Hotel, as liquidated 
damages for the following amount:

More than 24 months		10% of the total room revenue
23 months to 18 months	20% of the total room revenue
17 months to 12 months	30% of the total room revenue
11 months to 7 months	50% of the total room revenue
6 months to 5 months		75% of the total room revenue
4 months to arrival		100% of the total room revenue

In the event of cancellation by SRM, Hotel will use its best efforts to 
resell the cancelled sleeping rooms and/or function space and credit those 
revenues against liquidated damages in an amount not to exceed the full 
amount of such damages.  Liquidated damages, it any shall be dues and payable 
thirty (30) days after the event dates.

In the event of closure or cancellation by the Hotel, the Hotel shall pay SRM 
the same liquidated damages as stated above and Hotel will pay for all 
relocation costs including sleeping room and meeting room costs over and 
above those provided by this Agreement and associated shuttle costs.

CONSTRUCTION

The Hotel shall promptly notify SRM of any construction or remodeling to be 
performed in Hotel prior to or over the Event dates and Hotel warrants that 
any such construction and remodeling shall not interfere with SRM's use of 
Hotel.  Should construction be determined by SRM to interfere with the Event, 
SRM will be considered to have justifiable reasons to cancel without 
prejudice or penalty from Hotel and Hotel will incur all cost associated with 
the change of venue.  In addition, should Hotel be sold, this contract 
commitment will be honored.

CONDITION OF PREMISES

Hotel will insure that the property is in the same or better condition than 
it was at the time this contract is signed and will maintain its current 
"star" or "diamond" rating by any specified rating service.  Failure to 
maintain that status is grounds for terminating this contract by SRM.

ADA COMPLIANCE

Hotel represents that the facilities that are the subject of this Agreement 
comply in every applicable respect with the "Public Accommodations" 
requirements found in Title III of the American with Disabilities Act (ADA).  
Hotel facilities including, but not limited to, meeting space, restrooms, 
dining areas, other common areas and sufficient guest rooms, shall be 
reasonably accessible and usable by persons with disabilities.

SRM shall take steps to provide a process for determining in advance the need 
of auxiliary aids and services required by the ADA to be made available to 
persons admitted to the Event, and shall use its best efforts to make such 
aids and/or services available in a manner consistent with the ADA.  Hotel 
shall cooperate in making such auxiliary aids and services available at SRM 
expense.

FORCE MAJEURE

A delay in or failure of either SRM or Hotel to perform its obligations as 
described herein, shall not constitute default under this Agreement nor give 
rise to any claim for damage if and to the extent such delay or failure is 
caused by occurrences, whether direct or indirect, reasonably beyond the 
control for the party affected, including, but not limited to: acts of God, 
war, government regulations, disaster, strikes, civil disorder, curtailment 
of transportation facilities, or other emergency that makes the Agreement 
inadvisable, illegal or if it is impossible to provide the facility, or hold 
the event.  Termination pursuant to this section shall be by written notice 
provided thirty (30) days after the Event giving rise to cancellation in 
accordance with the provision.

INSURANCE AND INDEMNIFICATION

Hotel and SRM each agrees to carry adequate liability and other insurance 
protecting it against any claims arising from any activities conducted in the 
Hotel during the Event.  Each party hereby indemnifies and holds the other 
harmless from any loss, liability, cost or damages arising from actual or 
threatened claims or causes of action resulting from the negligence of such 
party or its respective officers, directors, employees, agents, contractors, 
members, or participants as applicable.

ATTORNEY FEES AND INTEREST

If any issue requires an attorney's involvement, the prevailing party may 
recover all attorney fees, as well as interest in the contested amount.

THIRD PARTY INVOLVEMENT

Rates quoted by Hotel in this Agreement do not include commissions or fees to 
any professional meeting planning companies.  If SRM intends to contract with 
a third party, Hotel reserves the right to add commissions or fees to the 
rates already quoted in this Agreement.

ACCEPTANCE	

The outlined format and dates are being held on a First-Option basis until 
"OptDate".  Upon receipt of this Agreement by Hotel, SRM will be placed on a 
definite basis and the Agreement will be binding upon Hotel and SRM.  If a 
commitment cannot be made prior to "OptDate", the Agreement will revert to a 
Second-Option basis or the arrangements may be released.  At such time 
neither party will have any obligations under the Agreement.

ENTIRE AGREEMENT

This Agreement contains all of the terms and conditions agreed upon by the 
parties and no other Agreements, oral or otherwise, shall be binding upon 
said parties.

"Hotel"						SOCIETY FOR RANGE MANAGEMENT

Executive Vice President
Society for Range Management

Date							Date

APPENDIX E

TRADE SHOW (INFORMATION MARKETPLACE) COSTS 2008 IGC IRC

We need to establish three levels:

1.  Commercial companies based in China are in a position to benefit 
financially from being in a Trade Show in China.  They should pay a fee for 
doing so.  It seems that the figure of $US 2500 as suggested by Gordon King's 
research is adequate.

2.  Commercial companies not based in China are not going to benefit 
financially to the extent that those in China will.  There still may be some 
economic benefit to them by showing that they support the concept of the 
Congress and thus folks back home might turn their 
business towards them.  The cost to them to get their materials and 
themselves to China, however, is considerable.  They should pay a fee of no 
more than they are accustomed to pay at home.  In the U.S. this is currently 
$500.  This may still be a bit high realizing their cost to get to China. 

3.  Then there are the nonprofits and governmental organizations who simply 
want to showcase their activities.  We might call this Publicity and 
Informational.   These folks should pay no more than the cost to occupy the 
space with no profit to the Congress.  Or perhaps they should be subsidized 
by the congress and pay nothing so as to attract them to the congress where 
they pay registration, etc.

Maybe we need to change the name of the whole event to "Information 
Marketplace".   We have found in SRM that it is best to mix the nonprofits 
with the commercial so that all are in one location.  A person looking for 
information is "forced" to see the commercial exhibits, a fact that 
commercial exhibitors appreciate.  

APPENDIX F

CONTENTS

REGISTRATION TIMES&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&...2
REGISTRATION ADDRESS&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&..2
REGISTRATION CONCERNS&&&&&&&&&&&&&&..2
DISPLAYSETUP TIMES&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&......2
EXHIBITION DAYS&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&2
EXHIBITION REMOVAL TIMES&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&..2
DISPLAY CONCERNS&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&3
ADMISSION&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&.3
ACCOMMODATION&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&..3
AUDIOVISUAL&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&...3
CAR PARKING&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&3
CLEANING OF STAND&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&.3
TRANSPORTATION&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&..4
DISPLAY GUIDELINES&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&.....4
MOVE-IN/BUILD-UP&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&.....4
MOVE-OUT/DISMANTLING&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&...4
MOVE-OUT/DISMANTLING TIMES&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&.5
NOISE&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&...5
PLANTS/LANDSCAPING/CARPET&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&5
REGULATIONS&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&.. &5
DISPLAY MATERIAL&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&6
SHELL SCHEME (DISPLAY STAND)&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&..6
TRAVEL&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&6
MANUFACTURE OF TRANSACTIONS&&&&&&&&&&&&&&& &6
ENTRY INTO CHINA&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&6
REMITTANCE&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&7
CONTACT INFORMATION &&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&.7

The 2008 China (Inner Mongolia) International Grassland Expo conference 
guidance

REGISTRATION TIMES
Friday 27th June 2008 9:00am-5:00pm

REGISTRATION ADDRESS
Inner Mongolia International Convention & Exhibition Center, Hohhot city, 
China
Address: Eastern end of University east road, Hohhot city

REGISTRATION CS
Exhibitor should obtain their representative card from the Committee.

DISPLAYSETUP TIMES
Friday 27th June 2008 9:00am-5:00pm
Saturday 28th June 2008 9:00am-5:00pm

EXHIBITION DAYS
Sunday 29th June 2008 9:00am-5:00pm
Monday 30th June 2008 9:00am-5:00pm
Tuesday 1st July 2008 9:00am-5:00pm
Wednesday 2nd July 2008 9:00am-2:30pm

EXHIBITION REMOVAL TIMES
Wednesday 2nd July 2008 2:30pm-6:00pm

DISPLAY CONCERS 
For the sake of the Exhibitors' convenience, Exhibitors can drive directly 
onto unloading area at the rear of the Convention & Exhibition Center.

ADMISSION
Exhibitors will be given a representative card to use when entering the 
Exhibition area for the duration of the Exhibition.

ACCOMMODATIONS
Please contact the Office of 2008 IGC & IRC Local Committee 
Tel: + 86 471- 4302830 
Fax: + 86 471- 4302820 
Email: igc_irc2008@188.com

AUDIOVISUALS
If you require hiring any AV equipment for your stand, please contact the 
Office of 2008 IGC & IRC Local Committee

CAR PARKING
There is a limited number of secured Exhibitor parking spots available at the 
rear of the Exhibition Centre. These spots are available on a first come 
first served basis and are free parking for the duration of the congress. 
There is also additional free parking at the front of the Exhibition Centre.

CLEANING OF STAND 
All exhibition areas will be cleaned each night and we ask for your 
cooperation by ensuring that your stand is kept as clean and tidy as 
possible. At the end of the exhibition day, all rubbish should be placed in 
the aisle in front of your stand for removal by the cleaners. Any items left 
after the show will be deemed as rubbish.

TRANSPORTATION
Please contact China outward transport corporation Inner Mongolia branch
Tel: +86 471-2211932
Fax: +86 471-2211253
Contact person: WU Jian-guo
E-mail:wuyuanwen2008@sohu.com
E-mail:lalaku5@yahoo.com.cn

DISPLAY GUIDELINES 
Exhibitors are required to ensure attention is given to the overall visual 
presentation of their display. Any publicity or information will not be 
permitted except display goods. Stands must not exceed the said dimensions as 
per your Space Booking Agreement.

MOVE-IN/BUILD-UP
The following dates and times have been allocated for the building and 
dressing of stands by contractors and for assembling of equipment, products 
and associated displays by exhibitors.
Friday 27th June 2008 9:00am-5:00pm (All Exhibitors)
Friday 27th June 2008 9:00am-5:00pm (All Exhibitors)
Should exhibitors wish to work outside the hours stated above, they should 
apply in writing, 30 days prior to the Congress to the organization committee 
of the Exhibition. 

MOVE OUT/DISMANTLING
Stands are NOT to be dismantled or merchandise removed before the official 
closing of the Exhibition at 2:00pm, 2nd July. Exhibitors are advised to 
remove all valuable and portable exhibits at the close of the Exhibition.

MOVE-OUT/DISMANTLING TIMES 
Wednesday 2nd July 2008 2:30pm-6:00pm

NOISE
Microphones or sound amplification will not be permitted. However machine 
demonstrations and videos will be permitted where the level of sound causes 
no annoyances to neighboring Exhibitors. The organization committee of the 
Exhibition shall be the sole judge as to whether there is any annoyance to 
the other Exhibitors or the visiting public.

PLANTS/LANDSCAPING/CARPET
Plants, landscaping and carpet can be hired. If you have any needs, please 
contact the 2008 China (Inner Mongolia) International Grassland Expo 
Committee.
Tel: +86 471-6563894
Fax: +86 471-6563894
Email:cyblh@126.com

REGULATIONS
No attachments, fittings, fixtures or defacement are to be made to the 
flooring, roof or the internal or external walls.
Display material
Any material used for stand construction or display purposes must conform to 
the following standards:
·	Non-combustible materials
·	Inherently non-flammable materials
·	Flame proof fabric
·	Self extinguishing plastic materials
·	Plywood, hardwood, pulpwood or fiberboard rendered flame resistant by a 
process of impregnation acceptable to the Authorities.

SHELL SCHEME (DISPLAY STAND)
Shell scheme specifications
Booth Size  
Height:
Stand name: The stand name is uniform uppercase lettering.
Spotlights: Two spotlights are supplied.
Table: One table
Chair: Two chairs

TRAVEL
If you require booking Domestic International Airfares, please contact the 
Office of 2008 IGC & IRC Local Committee. 

MANUFACTURE OF TRANSACTIONS
Exhibitors, please send your company's name, contact address and company's 
introduction to the organization committee.
Email:cyblh@126.com

ENTRY CHINA 
Please list name and passport numbers for the people coming to China to the 
organization committee(Quickly revert).
The 2008 China (Inner Mongolia) International Grassland Expo Committee
Tel: +86 471-6563894
Fax: +86 471-6563894
Email:cyblh@126.com

REMITTANCE
The beneficiary's bank information
NAME: BANK OF CHINA INNER MONGOLIA BRANCH
ADDRESS: NO.88 EAST XINCHENG STREET HUHHOT INNER MONGOLIA P.R.OF CHINA
SWIFT: BKCHCNBJ880
ACCOUNT NO. 14058341
The beneficiary' information
Account No. /ID NO.
140535122908091014 (for American dollar)
Name: The Office of 2008 IGC & IRC Local Committee
Address: NO.28, North Hulunber Road, Hohhot, Inner Mongolia, 010051, P.R. 
China
Tel: +86 471-4302830 
Fax: +86 471-4302820 

CONTACT INFORMATION
The 2008 China (Inner Mongolia) International Grassland Expo Committee
Tel: +86 471-6563894
Fax: +86 471-6563894
Email:cyblh@126.com

APPENDIX G

Dear Exhibitor:

The Society for Range Management (SRM) cordially invites you to participate 
in our  Annual Meeting and Trade Show in , .  The 
meeting and trade show will be held in the .

The Society for Range Management is the professional and scientific society 
whose members are concerned with studying, conserving, managing, and 
sustaining the varied resources of the rangelands which comprise nearly half 
of the land in the world.  Established in 1948, SRM has over 4000 members in 
48 countries, including many developing nations.  Its members include 
ranchers, rangeland managers, scientists, educators, students and 
conservationists.  We anticipate up to 2000 attendees at the meeting.

Exhibit space for  10 x 8 ft booths is available at the two-
day Trade Show.  Set-up starts at 

APPENDIX H

2008 China (Inner Mongolia) International Grassland/Rangeland
Marketplace and Information Show

Rangelands and grasslands are green belts, the basis of animal husbandry and 
promising economic sources for tourism within China.  With 40 million 
hectares, or 41.7 percent of the land area, China has the second largest land 
mass in the world.  To highlight this resource the International Grassland 
Congress and the International Rangeland Congress will be held jointly in 
Hohhot, Inner Mongolia, from 29 June to 5 July 2008.

In order to demonstrate the achievements and developments of grassland 
science and industry such as and to popularize new products, new plant 
varieties and new technologies an International Grassland and Rangeland 
Marketplace and Information  Show will be held from June 29 to July 1, 2008 
at the Hohhot International Convention and Exhibition Center, the site of the 
2008 International Grassland/Rangeland Congress.  This Marketplace and 
Information Show will improve international cooperation and information 
exchange for exhibiting products, exchanging industry information and 
exploring international markets for grass seed, feed and feed additives, 
machinery, animal health products and processing equipment, as well as 
cultural and artistic items of interest to international delegates attending 
the Congress.

Available Space:

Indoor space will be available with an indoor standard booth of 9 sq. m. 
including one table, two chairs, two lights, three pieces of surrounding 
boards (3m X 3m X 2.4 m high), 220V/522W power, directory listing and 
exhibitor badges.  The cost for this indoor space is $US2000 for commercial 
products, which includes two Congress registrations. The cost is  $US670 for 
non-profit organizations such as professional societies or government 
agencies.

Outdoor space is available with a minimum of 25 sq. m. including one table, 
two chairs, two lights, 220V/522W power, directory listing and exhibitor 
badges.  Cost for this outdoor space will be $US1,500 for commercial 
products.  Each additional sq m. of space will be $US60 per sq. m.

Cost of space will ensure daily site cleaning daily and 24 hour security.

Available Advertizing:

A Marketplace and Information Show Bulletin, which will be published once 
prior to the Congress and included in all delegates registration packet.  
Cost for advertizing in the bulletin are:
Full Back Cover:  $US750
Full Inside Front Cover:  $US600
Inside Full Color Page:  $US400
In addition, there are other advertizing opportunities at a cost of:
Air Balloon throughout the Congress:  $US400
Pull Arch throughout the Congress:  $US400
Scroll Ad throughout the Congress:  $US250
Congress Bag, one side:  $US2000

Event Schedule:

28/29 June           -  Register and set up display
29 June PM         -  Reception and cocktail party for display personnel
30 June AM         -  Opening Ceremony of Marketplace and Information Show
30 June - 2 July  -  Displays and exhibits open
2 July PM            -  Exhibitors breakdown exhibits and remove from 
Convention
Center

Marketplace and Information Show registration deadline is 28 February 2008.  
Space will be assigned on a first come, first served basis.  Please fill in 
the Marketplace and Information Show registration form and FAX or mail to the 
address indicated.  Within 15 days of receiving your application you will be 
advised of cost and mechanism for payment.

Contact Information:

Mailing Address:  

2008 International Grassland/Rangeland Congress
Marketplace and Information Show
No. 28, North Hulunbeir Road
Hohhot, Inner Mongolia  010051
China

Telephone:

0471-6512335, 0471-6512325, 13948918816 or 13947124242

FAX:

0471-6512335

Contact: Miss Guo, Mr. Chang or Mr. Wang

Marketplace and Information Show Registration Form

Name (Chinese):
Name (English):
Mailing Address:
Phone Number:
Email Address:
FAX:
Booth Size Desired:
Number of booths:
Location (number of booth space) desired:
Special Requirements (voltage, decorating, extra space, etc):
Brief Description of Display and Contents:
Type of Advertisement Desired:
Arrival Date:
Departure Date:

APPENDIX I

Committee and Meeting Request
 Annual Meeting

All Committee and Group Meetings must request a meeting room through the .  Requests must be received by  to insure they will be 
printed in the program.  A tentative listing of committee and group meeting 
information will be included in the Pre-Convention Trail Boss if received by 
.

Committee or Group Name:
Meeting Date	Time of day	Meeting Length (hours)
	q am  q pm  q eve	q 2  q 4  q 6 q 8 q other	
	q am  q pm  q eve	q 2  q 4  q 6 q 8 q other	
	q am  q pm  q eve	q 2  q 4  q 6 q 8 q other	
	q am  q pm  q eve	q 2  q 4  q 6 q 8 q other	
	q am  q pm  q eve	q 2  q 4  q 6 q 8 q other	
Chair Name:Mailing Address:	Phone:FAX:Email:	Number attending:
Special request (time, facilities, A/V equipment, etc.):
List any other committee or group meetings that would conflict with the 
membership of this meeting:  
Deadlines:	For inclusion in Pre-Convention Trail Boss	For 
inclusion in Program	
Send request to:	Phone: FAX: Email: 

APPENDIX J

CALL FOR PAPERS
___th Annual Meeting

The theme for the  Annual Meeting will be  with scientific and 
technical programs to enhance our understanding of the history of rangeland 
ecosystems and contribute to discussions of resource management in the 21st 
Century.

For poster or contributed paper presentations, submit your abstract and 
associated information in one of the following forms:
1.	Attach a WordPerfect (. wpd) or MS Word (.doc) file, PC or MAC, to an e-
mail message with "SRM ABSTRACT" on the subject line to: 

Note: Special symbols, superscripts, and Greek letters will be more likely to 
come through in Word or Wordperfect files on disk or attached.

2.	Submit a WordPerfect or MS Word file on a 3.5" (IBM) diskette to: 
SRM 2002 Abstracts
Attn: 

If there are any problems or questions, or if you do not receive confirmation 
of your email submission within two weeks, con tact:  @ 

IMPORTANT: 
Submit the abstract and associated information in the same format as the 
example provided below.  Abstracts should be no longer than 250 words.  
Authors are solely responsible for all editing of abstracts.  Authors need to 
select a Subject Matter Topic Code (Item 2 on Abstract Format) to match their 
presentation.  If in doubt about the appropriate code, select the most 
appropriate General Topic Code (in bold).  If a traditional presentation is 
to be a preproject proposal, please indicate Code #120 in addition to the 
Subject Matter Topic Code.

Abstracts should include a statement of objectives, a brief description of 
methods, a concise presentation of the actual results, and a summary 
statement or conclusions.  Abstracts and titles are due .  Authors will 
be notified of acceptance or rejection by .

10 Ecology	40 Vegetation Management and 	70 Soils/Hydrology 
11 Autecology	     Ecosystem Restoration 		71 Watersheds 
12 Synecology 	41 Burning 		72 Erosion 
13 Competition 	42 Chemical 
14 Succession 	43 Mechanical		80 Livestock Production 
15 Riparian 	44 Biological 		81 Production systems 
16 Rangeland Reference Areas 	45 Fertilization 		82 Research 
Techniques 
17 Nutrient Cycling 	46 Irrigation 		83 Supplementation 
18 Plant-Soil Relations 	47 Reseeding 
48 Strategies 		100 Rangeland Pests
20 Ecophysiology 	49 Excellence in Range Management 	101 Weeds 
21 Photosynthesis 			102 Diseases 
22 Water Relations 	50 Inventory 		103 Insects 
23 Carbohydrates and Nutrients 	51 Methods 
24 Rooting Behavior 	52 Measurements 		110 Rangeland Social Science 
25 Allelopathy 	53 Remote Sensing 		111 Economics 
26 Plant Defoliation 	54 Landscape Ecology 		112 History 
27 Germination 			113 Sociology 
60 Wildlife 		114 Recreation 
30 Grazing Management 	61 Habitat Relationship 		115 Education 
31 Animal 	62 Predator-Prey Relations 		120 Pre-project Proposal 
32 Animal Behavior 	63 Livestock/Wildlife Interrelations 
33 Plant Response 	64 Nutrition 		Posters Only 
34 Animal Response 	65 Recreational Leasing 		200 Grazier's Forum 
Posters (formerly 35 Livestock Nutrition 			       Rancher's Forum) 
36 Plant-Animal Interactions 			201 Outstanding Rangeland 
37 Soil Effects 			      Management 

Subject Matter Topic Codes: 
Abstract Format- SRM Annual Meeting,  
1.	Author(s) (Author's Last Name, First MI; separate multiple authors with 
a semicolon) 
2.	Subject Matter Topic Codes: First Choice, Second Choice (separated by 
comma)
3.	Presentation Preference: Traditional, Poster
4.	Institution: 
5.	Address: (separate address elements with commas) 
6.	Phone Number, Fax Number, Email Address: (separate by comma, enter N/A 
if not available) 
7.	SRM Membership of Contact Author: Member, Student, Non-member 
8.	Who will present the paper? (Presenting author must be a paid registrant 
at the annual meeting.) 
9.	Graduate Student Competition Category: Masters, Ph.D., N/A
10.	Presentation Preference: Traditional, Poster
11.	Title/Author information 
12.	Abstract 
13.	Special symbols (see previous instructions) 

EXAMPLE ABSTRACT SUBMISSION (Remember to include the numbers): 

1.	Pfister, James A. 
2.	36 
3.	Traditional 
4.	USDA-ARS Poisonous Plant Research Lab 
5.	1150 E. 1400 N., Logan, UT 84341 
6.	(435) 752-2941, (435) 752-2943, jpfister@cc.usu.edu 
7.	Member 
8.	James A. Pfister 
9.	N/A 
10.	CATTLE CONSUMPTION OF PONDEROSA PINE NEEDLES IN THE BLACK HILLS. James 
A. Pfister, USDA-ARS Poisonous Plant Research Lab, Logan, UT 84341. 
11.	Consumption of ponderosa pine needles by pregnant cattle often causes 
abortions, and the Black Hills region has a history of serious abortion 
problems from pine needles. The objectives of these studies were to (1) 
determine the amount of pine needles eaten by grazing and pen-fed cattle, and 
relate consumption to weather variables; (2) determine if pine needle 
temperature (degrees C) influenced acceptability to penned cows. Trial 1 was 
conducted from December 1991 to February 1992 about 20km west of Pringle, 
South Dakota, using 8 mature pregnant cows. The winter of 1991-1992 was mild, 
and cattle averaged < 0.5% of their bites as pine needles. Trial 2 was 
conducted in the same location from January to March 1993. Six pregnant cows 
were penned individually, and offered 1 kg/day of fresh pine needles. Six 
open cows grazed a pine tree infested pasture. 
Normal winter weather prevailed, and grazing cattle consumed 20% of bites as 
pine needles. Cattle selected primarily green pine needles as consumption 
increased, particularly from small (< 2m) trees. Pen-fed cows ate 438 g/day 
of nee- dies, but consumption was not related to weather. No abortions 
occurred. In 2 pen trials using heated and frozen needles, cattle showed no 
clear preferences. Weather is a major factor influencing consumption of 
needles by grazing cattle, but needle temperature alone may not be important. 

APPENDIX K

Call for Special Sessions/Symposia
 Annual Meeting
Society For Range Management

The goal of symposia, workshops, and forums are to provide information in 
formats not appropriate to the Concurrent Sessions normally used at SRM 
Annual Meetings. We offer the following as guidelines in developing your 
event. 

In recent years, many of the symposia held at the SRM Annual Meeting have 
been held in the same format as the Concurrent Sessions. No written record 
(proceedings or summary) have been developed to provide the information 
beyond the event, thus limiting the effectiveness of the event. In an effort 
to provide a better format for critical and timely delivery of information or 
to better define direction and trends in specialized areas, we are requiring 
certain guidelines be followed in developing your event. Abstracts will be 
required of all events except the Workshop format which is optional. 

We will use the following event guidelines: 

Concurrent Session-T he normal format that has timed presentations that are 
made up of volunteered papers from the membership or otherwise. This format 
would not allow for audience participation unless time is available after a 
presentation. 
Specialized Concurrent Session-A set of presentations following the regular 
concurrent session format covering a specific, narrow topic. This format 
would not allow for audience participation unless time is available after a 
presentation or made available as a part of the program. 
Symposium1-A set of presentations covering a distinct topic with discussion 
periods included for audience participation. A published proceedings or 
summary of presentations will be provided (preferably at the symposium) to 
convey the information beyond the event. 
Forum2-A set of presentations covering a distinct topic with discussion 
periods included for audience participation. No written record of the event 
is planned. 
Workshop3-A meeting featuring presentations designed to update or educate a 
specific group for better understanding of a topic, training, or to gain 
certification or credit on a topic. The participants would reasonably be 
expected to stay in the workshop and not participate in other events. 

Please follow these guidelines in planning your event. A well-planned program 
will provide a quality event that always does more than is expected. 

Complete the form on reverse and mail, fax, or email (in WordPerfect 6 or MS-
Word formats) to: 
	Phone: 
	Fax: 
	Email: 

1May include one or more additional organizations or agencies that will 
partner in developing, promoting, and conducting the event. 
2May be printed or CD. 
3May be sponsored by any organization or agency that partners with SRM 
without SRM being involved (Forest Service, NRCS, BLM, etc.). 

Request for Special Sessions/Symposia
Society for Range Management
 Annual Meeting

The Planning Committee invites proposals for the  Annual Meeting to be 
presented .  Please use the form below or supply the same information.  
See instructions on reverse.

Check one:     q Symposium   q Workshop    q Forum                Length 
(hours):       q Specialized Concurrent Session                               
q 4     q 6     q 8
Title of Event:
Objective:
Organizer:Name:Title:	Phone:Fax:Email:	Published record?q Proceedingsq Summary
Partner Organization(s): (List with contacts)
Deadlines:                                                  Proposal 
submission:                                                              
Notification of acceptance:                                                      
Abstracts & final program:    

Audio/Visual Equipment Needs:

APPENDIX L

WHY NOT AN EXCELLENT SRM ORAL PRESENTATION

The Quality Depends on You!
It is an honor to present a paper at Society meetings. The audience expects 
quality presentations from speakers. Unfortunately, many of us in technical 
areas are not educated in making concise, effective presentations. We tend to 
emphasize technical accuracy and detail over the effective presentation of 
our information. The audience's opinion of you and your institution depends 
on both the content and the presentation of your paper. The following 
suggestions provide information that will aid you in slide preparation and 
presentation.

Slide Presentations
1.	Convey only one main idea per slide.
2.	Express ideas first pictorially in illustrations, cartoons, photos, or 
diagrams.
3.	Graphs, charts, or diagrams are preferable over tables and words for 
understanding complicated data.
4.	If words are necessary, use concise phrases with abbreviated symbols 
instead of sentences. In a 15-minute talk a good general rule is to plan to 
present 4 to 5 points.
5.	Instead of one complex slide, make several simplified slides with a 
conclusion slide describing the over-all concept.
6.	General interest in your talk by:
a)	Using slides with contrasting colors.
b)	Minimize clutter. If you introduce a slide by saying, "You may not be 
able to read this, but&," please, do not show it. Get another slide.
7.	An excellent brochure entitled "Effective Lecture Slides" is available 
from Kodak, Pamphlet No.S-22, Photo Information, Department 84', Rochester, 
NY 14650 or phone Ed. Division (716)724-4000 for further information.
8.	Several rehearsals should insure a smooth presentation and made sure the 
15-minute time limit is easy to observe. The Society always provides 
preparation/practice rooms.
9.	Allow time for questions at the end of your presentation, and please 
restate the question before answering.

REMEMBER TALK TO THE AUDIENCE NOT THE SCREEN!!!
COBBLED UP SLIDES OR OVERHEADS ARE NOT EFFECTIVE.

APPENDIX M

GUDELINES FOR POSTER DESIGN AND PREPARATION 

Please consider the following points when planning and preparing your poster.

1.	Keep it simple; stick to key points and essential information, use a 
minimum of text.

2.	Make it self-explanatory; there will be time when poster is on display 
without you present, so be sure it tells a logical, coherent story. Remember, 
excessive detail hurts rather than helps in this regard; interested viewers 
can ask you about particulars during the formal session.

3.	Make our poster easy to read. Large lettering, bold, but simple figures, 
and a clear, easy-to-follow layout are essential.

The following guidelines offer some practical suggestions for achieving a 
well-presented poster.

Contents
Your poster should include the following:

·	Title, followed by name and affiliation of the author(s)
·	Introduction - state the problem or area of investigation
·	Purpose - what you investigated and why you are presenting this 
information
·	Methods - lab techniques, experimental design, sampling method, etc.
·	Results - graphs, photos, artwork, etc.
·	Conclusion (Always last) - list finding, summary, interpretation, and 
implications

Legibility and Readability
1)	Title and Headings:

·	Reserve the top 4 inches of your poster for the title, author's name(s), 
and affiliation(s).
·	Use letters about 1 inch high (ALL CAPS) for the title.
·	Use letters about ½ to 2/3 inches high for authors and affiliations.
·	Use letters about 3/8 to 5/8 inches high for headings.

2)	Text

·	All text should be legible from 5 feet away. This means a minimum letter 
size of 3/16 to ¼ inches for all text, including tables, figure captions, and 
labels.
·	Make text upper and lower case.
·	Use a sans serif typeface (e.g. Megaron, Helvetica, Letter Gothic); they 
are easier to read and look better.
·	Use all caps, bold or italic lettering to highlight paragraphs.
·	Keep adequate "white" space around statements for easier reading.
·	Remember!! Stick to key points and essential information.
·	Keep text to a minimum.

3)	Figures, Tables, and Photographs:

·	Figures can be understood much more easily and quickly than tables; 
convert all tables to figures if possible.
·	Keep figures simple. Use bold lines and large symbols for easy reading 
from a distance. Make lines at least 0/8 mm wide, preferably larger (drawing 
pen sizes 3-7 make lines ranging from about 0.8 to 2 mm wide). Symbols should 
be at least 3 mm in diameter.
·	Each figure should be accompanied by a short line of interpretation that 
summarized the "take-home" message of the figure.
·	Photographs should be clear, and show what they are intended to show. If 
they don't, consider artwork instead.
·	If you must use a table, keep it simple - just a few row and columns.
·	Stick to a minimum of 3/15 to ¼ inch lettering in all tables, figure 
captions, and labels.

Layout and Organization
·	Poster size will be 4x8 feet. Reserve the top 4 inches of our poster for 
the title, author's name(s), and affiliation(s).
·	An 8-foot wide poster can accommodate 6 columns 12 to 14 inches wide, or 
8 columns of 10 to 11 inches wide. Height of individual panels (e.g. figures, 
sections of text, etc) do not need to be uniform in size however, keeping 
column widths the same size will result in a more pleasing layout.
·	Your poster should start with the introduction in the upper left corner 
and end with the conclusion in the lower right corner.
·	Try to avoid using large paragraphs or blocks of text anywhere on your 
poster. Separate, individual statements are much easier to read.
·	Do not crowd your poster. Leave space (or colored borders) around 
individual panels. Be generous with "white" space around text within panels.

Production Methods for titles Heading, and Text
Methods vary widely in cost, availability, and time required, Here are some 
suggestions:

·	Typesetting produces very high quality results, but is probably the most 
expensive approach. Smaller type can be used, and then enlarged 
photographically or by photocopying.
·	Many computers are equipped with plotters and can produce lettering of 
appropriate size and quality. Some high-quality printers may also give good 
results. But pay attention to letter darkness and heaviness as well as size; 
printer output may be light, and plotter lines tend to be narrow.
·	Kroytype machines, which produce various sizes of lettering on clear, 
adhesive tape, are good for making titles and headings, but not too feasible 
for large amounts of text. Titles probably have to be enlarged 
photographically or by photocopying.
·	Press-on lettering can also be used for titles and headings, but extra 
care is required to achieve proper letter spacing and alignment.
·	If all else fails, you can produce adequate text by using a quality 
typewriter if you have access to some type of enlargement capabilities 
(either photographic or photocopy). Always use a new carbon film ribbon and 
if possible, a bold or multiple strike option.

Use of Color
·	Color can be used to help organize your poster and make it easier to 
read as well as more attractive.
·	A backing of colored paper for each panel on the poster (extending about 
½ inch beyond each edge) is an inexpensive and attractive way to highlight 
material.
·	Different colors of backing paper or colored bars down the margin(s) can 
be used for material in different sections (e.g. methods, results, etc.) to 
help organize the poster.
·	Colored tape or yarn stretched between pins and be used at a "pointer" 
to connect sections of text with key points of figures.
·	Colored lines or stripes of tape between columns or rows can help guide 
the viewer through the poster in the proper sequence.

Poster Assembly
Poster can be either mounted or unmounted

1)	Mounted - This gives a neater, more professional look. When mounted, use 
a lightweight board approximately 1/16 inch thick. A 10" x 12" panel will fit 
comfortably in most briefcases. The title can be cut in 2 or 3 pieces, or 
scored and folded. You can also mount your whole poster on one full-size 
foamcore or poster board backing, if you can conveniently transport it to the 
meeting.

2)	Unmounted - This is lighter, and panels can be rolled up; a reverse roll 
will usually fix the curl.

Be prepared to assemble and hang the poster yourself. We will be using boards 
covered with carpet, therefore, you will need an adequate supply of "Hook" 
tape (Velcro type). Electricity will be available if necessary, but you 
should bring your own extension cord (at least 25 feet) All poster boards 
will be numbered. Each participant will be assigned a poster location when 
they check in to set up the poster.

APPENDIX N

Guidelines for authors preparing paper
1. Paper
Typing and style guides: All papers should be sent to the Scientific 
Committee (2008igc_irc@lzu.edu.cn) in digital form. All text should be 
singlespaced
unless otherwise stated herein. Left and right justified typing is preferred. 
A4 size paper with the margin of top 25 mm, bottom 25 mm,
left 20 mm and right 20mm should be used.
Preparation in electronic form: The authors are requested to provide their 
papers in MS Word (.doc) format. Do not apply page numbering.
Length and font: All offered papers submitted electronically are limited to a 
size of no more than one single-spaced pages (A4 size), invited one
no more than six single-spaced pages, and plenary paper no more than eight 
single-spaced pages in the printed version of the proceedings,
including key points, figures, tables and references. Times New Roman with a 
size of 10 points is to be used.
2. Title and key words block
Title: The title should appear centered in bold letters without underlining, 
near the top of the first page of the paper. The font type Times New
Roman with a size of 12 points is to be used. Use more than one line if you 
wish, but always use single-spacing. After one blank line, type the author
(s) name(s), affiliation, mailing address, e-mail of corresponding author In 
upper and lower case letters centered under the title. In the case of
multi-authorship, group them by organization as shown in the title of these 
Guidelines.
Key words:
For offered papers: Leave one blank line under the Title. Type "Key words:" 
flush left in bold capital letters, followed by less than 5 key words
For invited or plenary papers: Leave one blank line under Title. Type "Key 
points" flush left in bold. Start now with a concise Key points (limited to
150 words) which presents briefly the content and very importantly, the news 
and results of the paper in words understandable also to nonspecialists.
Type text single-spaced.
Leave one blank lines under the Key points. Type "Key words:" flush left in 
bold, followed by less than 5 key words
3. Main body of text
The main body should have Introduction, Materials & Methods, Results & 
Discussion, Conclusions, References sections. Type text single-spaced,
with one blank line between paragraphs, and the following headings. Start 
paragraphs flush with the left margin.
3.1 Headings
Major headings: Major headings or section headings are flush left in bold 
without underlining and followed by a single line space
Subheadings: Type subheadings flush with the left margin with a bold upper 
case initial letter and lower case letters. Subheadings are on a
separate line between two single blank lines.
3.2 Footnotes
Avoid footnotes, but if you need them, mark footnotes in the text with an 
asterisk (*); use a double asterisk (**) for a second footnote on the same
page. Place footnotes at the bottom of the page, separated from the text 
above it by a horizontal line.
3.3 Illustrations
Tables: All tables should be produced directly within the text. Each table 
should have a number and a caption.
Figures: All figures must be in digital form in the appropriate location in 
the document.
Placement: Tables and Figures must be placed in the appropriate location in 
the document, as close as practicable to the reference of the figure
13
International Grassland Congress & International Rangeland Congress
in the text. While figures and tables are usually aligned horizontally on the 
page, large figures and tables sometimes need to be turned on their
sides. If you must turn a figure or table sideways, please be sure that the 
top is always on the left-hand side of the page.
Captions: All captions should be typed in upper and lower case letters, 
centered directly beneath the illustration. Use single spacing if they use
more than one line. All captions are to be numbered consecutively, e.g. Fig. 
1, Fig. 2, Table 1, Table 2
Copyright: If your article contains any copyrighted illustrations or imagery, 
please include a statement of copyright such as: (c) SPOT Image
Copyright 19xx (fill in year), CNES. It is the author's responsibility to 
obtain any necessary copyright permission. The copyright of your article
remains with you.
3.4 Equations, symbols and units
Equations: Equations should be numbered consecutively throughout the paper. 
The equation number is enclosed in parentheses and placed flush
right. Leave one blank line before and after equations. E.g
(1)
Where c is focal length, x, y are image coordinates, X0, Y0, Z0 are 
coordinates of projection center, X', Y', Z' are object coordinates in ground
coordinate system.
Symbols and units: Use the SI (Systeme Internationale) Units and symbols. 
Unusual characters or symbols should be explained in a list of
nomenclature.
3.5 References and/or selected bibliography
References should enable a librarian to supply the quoted paper/book to the 
reader. References should be cited in the text, thus (Smith, 1987b;
Kawamura et al., 2000), and listed in alphabetical order in the reference 
section, leaving a blank line between references. The following
arrangements should be used:
References from Journals:
Stanford, G., Smith, S.J., 1972.Nitrogen mineralization potential of soil. 
Science Society America Journal 36, 465-472.
Kawamura, K., Akiyama,T., Watanabe,O., 2000. Estimation of aboveground 
biomass in Xilingol steppe using NOAA/NDVI. Grassland Science 49(1): 1-9.
Names of journals can be abbreviated according to the "International List of 
Periodical Title Word Abbreviations". In case of doubt, write names
in full.
References from Books:
Bogdan, A.V., 1977.Tropical Pasture and Fodder Plants. London: Longman,. 205-
212.
Robson, M. J., Sheehy, J. E., 1981. Leaf area and light interception . In: 
Hodgson J, Baker R D, Davies A, et al. Sward Measurement Handbook.
Berkshire: British Grassland Society, 115-139.
References from Other Literature:
Smith, J., 1987.Economic printing of color orthophotos. Arlington, VA, USA: 
Report KRL-01234, Kennedy Research Laboratories.
Smith, J., 2000.Remote sensing to predict volcano out bursts. In: The 
International Archives of the Photogrammetry, Remote Sensing and Spatial
Information Sciences Kyoto, Japan: Vol. XXVII, Part B1, , 456-469.
References from websites:
Moons, T., 1999.Report on the Joint ISPRS Commission III/IV Workshop "3D 
Reconstruction and Modelling of Topographic Objects", Stuttgart,
Germany[EB/OL]. http://www.radig.informatik.tu-muenchen.de/ISPRS/WG-III4-IV2-
Report.html.

APPENDIX 01 – SUMMARY

Total Income	 	 	 

EXPENSE	 	 	 	 
Cost		Proposed	Proposed	 
Center	Description	Revenue	Expenses	Net

ADM	Administration	 	 	 
FIN	Finance	 	 	 
HST	Host Activities	 	 	 
LOC	Local Arrangements	 	 	 
PRO	Program	 	 	 
PUB	Publicity	 	 	 
SPO	Sponsorship	 	 	 
STU	Student Activities	 	 	 
TRA	Trade Show	 	 	 

Total Expense		 	 	 

Net Annual Income (Loss)	 	 	 

APPENDIX O2 – ADMISTRATION

Income	 	Actual
Proposed	as of (date)		

Sponsorship				

Total Income	 	 		

Expense	 	 		

Administrative - Office Expenses	 	 	 	 
Postage & Shipping	 	 	 	 
Telephone & Fax	 	 	 	 
Other Misc	 	 	 	 

Other Administrative Expenses	 	 	 	 
Gratuities	 	 	 	 
Pre-Conference Planning	 	 	 	 
Planning Committee Post-Conference Dinner	 	 	 	 

SRM Office Equipment & Services	 	 	 	 
Computers/Printers	 	 	 	 
Copy Machine	 	 	 	 
Internet Service	 	 	 	 

Travel Expenses	 	 	 	 
Staff Travel to Meeting	 	 	 	 
Meeting Coordinator Pre-Conference Planning	 	 	 	 

Other Misc Expenses	 	 	 	 

Sponsorship	 	 		
Postage	 	 		
Telephone	 	 		

TOTAL EXPENSE	 	 		

Net Annual Income(Loss)	 	 		

APPENDIX O3 – FINANCE

Income	 	Actual		
Proposed	as of (date)			

Seed Money from HQ 	 	 			
Interest from AM Checking Account	 	 			

Total Income	 	 			

Expense	 	 			

Bank Charges/Fees		 			

Contingency Fund	 	 			

Office Expenses	 	 			
Postage	 	 			
Copying	 	 			
Supplies	 	 			

Reimbursement of Seed Money	 	 			

Total Expense	 	 			

Net Annual Income(Loss)	 	 			

APPENDIX O4 – SPONSORSHIP

Income	 	Actual					
Proposed	as of (date)		

Copper	 	 					
Bronze	 	 					
Silver	 	 					
Gold	 	 					
Platinum	 	 					
Diamond	 	 					

Total Income	 	 					

Expense	 	 					

Complimentary Booth w/Sponsorship		 					

Complimentary Registration w/Sponsorship	 	 					

Special Signage 	 	 					

Office Expenses	 	 					
Printing	 	 					
Postage	 	 					
Supplies	 	 					
Telephone/Fax	 	 					

Total Expense	 	 					

Net Annual Income(Loss)	 	 					

Appendix O5 - Local Arrangements		 					

Income	 	Actual	 
Proposed	as of (date)	

Registration Fees	 	 	
SRM Member Reg/Life - Early	 	 	
SRM Member Reg/Life - Regular	 	 	
SRM Emeritus Member - Early	 	 	
SRM Emeritus Member - Regular	 	 	
Spouse/Guest - Early	 	 	
Spouse/Guest - Regular	 	 	
Non-Member - Early	 	 	
Non-Member - Regular	 	 	
Day-Only 	 	 	

Total Income	 	$0 	

Expense	 	 	

Complimentary Registrations			
Affiliated Organizations	 	 	
Invited Speakers/Guests	 	 	
Staff	 	 	
Volunteers	 	 	

Equipment Rental - Registration Desk	 	 	
Server (1)	 	 	
Computer Workstations (4)	 	 	
Printers (4)	 	 	
APPENDIX O5 - LOCAL ARRANGEMENTS	 	
High-speed Internet Connection	 	 	

Registration Other	 	 	
Computer Network Technician	 	 	
Credit Card Processing Fees	 	 	
Clerical Services-Data Entry	 	 	
Postage	 	 	

Registration - Promotions	 	 	
Lapel Pins	 	 	
Tote Bags	 	 	

Registration Supplies	 	 	
Badge Holders/Lanyards	 	 	
Badge Stock/Designator Ribbons	 	 	
Special Designation Ribbons	 	 	
Misc Supplies	 	 	

Phone-Credit Card Machines	 	 	
Miscellaneous	 	 	

Equipment Rental	 	 	
Computers (4)	 	 	
Printers (4)	 		
Photocopier	 	 	
Copies	 	 	
Radio/Cell Phones	 	 	
Scanner	 	 	

Office		 	
Postage	 	 	
Copying	 		
Security	 	 	
Signs	 	 	
Phone	 	 	
Misc	 	 	

Total Expense	 	 	

Net Annual Income(Loss)	 	 	

APPENDIX O6 – HOST ACTIVITIES


Income	 	Actual	 	 
(Build in 20% profit over cost)	Proposed	as of (date)		

Grand Opening Event	 	 		

Tour Registration Fees	 	 		
Technical Tour #1	 	 		
Technical Tour #2	 	 		
Technical Tour #3	 	 		
Companion Tour #1	 	 		
Companion Tour #2	 	 		
Companion Tour #3	 	 		

Banquet Fees	 	 		

Breakfast/Luncheon Fees	 	 		
Professional Issues	 	 		
Past Presidents/Charter Members	 	 		

Total Income	 	$0 		

Expense	 	 		

Technical Tour #1	 	 		
Bus Transportation	 	 		
Meals/Refreshments	 	 		

Technical Tour #2	 	 		
Bus Transportation	 	 		
Meals/Refreshments	 	 		

Technical Tour #2	 	 		
Bus Transportation	 	 		
Meals/Refreshments	 	 		

Companion Tour #1	 	 		
Bus Transportation	 	 		
Meals/Refreshments	 	 		
Admission Fees	 	 		

Companion Tour #2	 	 		
Bus Transportation	 	 		
Meals/Refreshments	 	 		
Admission Fees	 	 		

Companion Tour #3  	 	 		
Bus Transportation	 	 		
Meals/Refreshments	 	 		
Admission Fees	 	 		

Dance	 	 		
Entertainment	 	 		
Dance Floor	 	 		
Cash Bar	 	 		

President's Reception	 	 		
Cash Bar	 	 		

Banquet	 	 		
Meal Cost/Gratuity	 	 		
Table Decorations	 	 		
Complimentary Meals	 	 		
Entertainment	 	 		

Breakfast/Luncheons	 	 		
Professional Issues	 	 		
Past Presidents/Charter Members	 	 		
President's Spouse Tea	 	 		

Hospitality	

APPENDIX O6 – HOST ACTIVITIES

 	 		
Batteries	 	 		
Misc	 	 		

Total Expense	 	$0 		

Net Annual Income(Loss)	 	$0 		

Appendix O7 - Student Activities

Income	Proposed	as of (date)	

Registration Fees	 	 	
Student Member - Early	 	 	
Student Member - Regular	 	 	
Student Non-Member - Early	 	 	
Student Non-Member - Regular	 	 	

Student Conclave Luncheon	 	 	
Registration Fees - Student	 	 	
Registration Fees - Non-Student	 	 	

Total Income	 	$0 	

Expense	 	 	
Student Conclave	 	 	
Food Service	 	 	
Business Meeting Refreshments/Gratuity	 	 	
Contest Grading Refreshments/Gratuity	 	 	
Luncheon Meal Cost/Gratuity	 	 	
Tapping the Top Refreshments/Gratuity	 	 	

Tour	 	 	
Bus Transportation	 	 	
Meals/Refreshments	 	 	

High School Youth Forum (HSFY)	 	 	
Food Service	 	 	
Business Meeting Refreshments/Gratuity	 	 	
Professional Interaction Dinner/Gratuity	 	 	
Social Refreshments/Gratuity	 	 	

Tour	 	 	
Bus Transportation	 	 	
Meals/Refreshments	 	 	

Other Expenditures	 	 	
Awards	 	 	
Poster Boards for Employment Office	 	 	
Misc	 	 	

Total Expense	 	$0 	

Net Annual Income(Loss)	 	$0 	

Appendix O8 - Program

Income	 	Actual
(Build in 20% profit over cost)	Proposed	as of (date)

Program	 	 
Advertising 	 	 

Abstracts	 	 
Advertising 	 	 

Total Income	 	 

Expense	 	 

Program/Abstracts	 	 
Abstract Submission Services	 	 
Set-up/Printing	 	 
Searchable CD	 	 

Other Expenses	 	 
Poster Boards (40)	 	 
Numbers for Poster Boards	 	 
Plenary Session Room Set	

APPENDIX O8 – PROGRAM

A/V Equipment	 	 

Speakers	 	 
Honorarium/Travel Expenses	 	 

Office	 	 
Postage	 	 
Misc	 	 

Total Expense	 	 

Net Annual Income(Loss)	 	 

Appendix O9 - Trade Show

Actual	
Income	Proposed	as of (date)	

Exhibits	 	 	
Commercial Member Booth	 	 	
Commercial Non-Member Booth	 	 	
Additional Booth	 	 	
Government/Non-Profit Booth	 	 	
Non-Profit Booth	 	 	
Range Club Booth	 	 	
Additional Range Club Booth	 	 	

Sponsorship	 	 	
1/4 Coffee Break	 	 	
1/2 Coffee Break	 	 	
Full Coffee Break	 	 	
Trade Show Mixer	 	 	

Expense	 	 	

Exhibits	 	 	
Booth Setup (pipe/drape/carpet/signage)	 	 	
Supplemental Pipe/Drape/Carpet/Signage	 	 	
Complimentary Booths	 	 	

Trade Show Mixer	 	 	
Refreshments/Gratuity	 	 	
Entertainment	 	 	

Refreshment Breaks	 	 	

SRM Silent Auction	 	 	

Security	 	 	
Security Services	 	 	
On-site EMS

APPENDIX O9 – TRADE SHOW

	 	 	
Net Annual Income(Loss)	 	 	

Appendix O10 - Publicity

Actual
Income	Proposed	as of (date)

Pre-Convention TBN	 	 
Advertising	 	 

Daily TBN	 	 
Advertising	 	 

Total Income	 	 

Expense	 	 

Pre-Conference Publicity/Advertising	 	 

Planning Committee Apparel (shirts/hats)	 	 

Logo & Theme	 	 
Artwork	 	 

Promotions	 	 
Banners	 	 
Booth Rental	 	 
Brochures/Post Cards	 	 
Postage	 	 

Pre-Convention TBN	 	 
Printing	 	 
Postage	 	 

Daily TBN	 	 
Printing	 	 
Photography	 	 
Computer/Printer Rental	 	 
Fax/Copy Machine	 

APPENDIX O10 – PUBLICITY

	 

Rangelands Articles	 	 
Publication (1st 12 pages @ no charge)	 	 

Total Expense	 	 

Net Annual Income(Loss)	 	 

APPENDIX P

Pay to the order of:					

Description of Service/Item:									

Expected Date of Purchase/Due Date:								

Budget Cost Center:											

Total Cost/Reimbursement:										

Signature of Requestor								Date
APPROVED BY:
or								
Finance Committee Chair					     Planning Committee 
Chair
FOR SRM OFFICE USE ONLY
Payment Date:									Check No.		

APPENDIX Q

APPENDIX R


Contributions to the 2008 International Grassland Congress/ International    
Rangeland Congress in Hohhot, Inner Mongolia Should be Sent To:

Mountain States Bank
1635 E. Colfax Ave.
Denver, CO 80218
Phone 303 - 388 - 3641

ATTN:  Society for Range Management Accounts

Routing Number 102000937
Account Number 8055444

APPENDIX S1

Washington, D.C. Fundraising IGC/IRC  -  2006
Contacts Made as of October 23, 2006
(* Denotes principal contact of O'Rourke in generating letters/contacts)

U.S. Department of Agriculture

Mike Johanns, Secretary of Agriculture
Susan Owens, Dir. Foreign Ag Serv, Res & Scient Exc Div (202-690-4872)
Mark Rey, Under Secretary for Natural Resources and the Environment (Yvette -  
(202-720-7173, FAX 202-720-0623)               
Bruce Knight, Chief, NRCS
* Larry Clark,Dep Chief Science & Technology (202-720-4630)
* Dennis Thompson,Nat Range/Grazing Ecol (202-720-5010)
Pat Shaver (503-273-2407)
Dale Bosworth, Chief, USFS
Joel Holtrop,Dep. Chief Nat For Systems (202-205-1523)
*Janette Kaiser, Nat. Range Leader (202-205-1185)
Anne Bartuska, Research Leader (202-205-1665) 
Dr. Chuck Lambert, Under Secretary for Marketing and Regulatory Programs
Jeremy Stump, Act Dep Under Sec (202-720-4256)
Dr. Ron DeHaven, Administrator, APHIS  (202-720-3668)
Rick Dunkle, Assoc Admin. 
John Payne, Asst Ep Admin (202-720-5601, FAX 202-690-0472, john.h.payne
@usda.gov, (Chauncey Robertson)
Paul Eggert, Assoc. Dep Admin (202-720-4441)
Kelly Porter, Intl Programs 
Osama El-Lissy, Director Invasive Species and Pest Management
*Alan Tasker, National Noxious Weed Program Manager  (301-734-5708)
Dr. Gale Buchanan, Under Secretary for Research, Education and Economics
Merle Pierson, Acting Under Secretary for Research, Education & Economics
Edward B. Knipling, Administrator, ARS -202-720-3656 (Kathy Lonaberger)
Antoinette Betschart, Assoc Admin (202-720-3658)
Pai-Yei Whung, Director Office of International Research Programs (301`-
504-4545)
* Ev Byington, National Prog. Leader,Rangeland,Pasture,Forage (301-504-
4625)
Colien Hefferan, Administrator, CSREES (202-720-4423)
*Dan Kugler,Dep Admin,Natural Resources and Environment (202-401-4555)
Bruce Menzel, Nat Prog Leader, Rangelands (202-401-5016)
Bill Hoffman, Homeland Security Lead (202-401-1112)
*Jim Dobrowolksi

U.S. Department of Interior

Dirk Kempthorne, Secretary of Interior (202-208-3100)
Lynn Scarlett, Acting Secretary of Interior (202-208-3100)
Tom Weimer, Assistant Secretary, Policy, Management and Budget
Acting Assistant Secretary, Indian Affairs
Pat Ragsdale, Director, BIA
Arch Wells, Director of Trust Services
Jeff Loman, Chief, Division of Natural Resources (202-703-8295)
*James Orwin, Soils/Acting as Range representative (202-208-6464)
Mark Limbaugh, Assistant Secretary, Water and Science
Dr. P. Patrick Leahy, Acting Director, U.S.  Geological Survey
*Jack Waide, Prog. Cord., Terres.,Freshwater & Marine Ecosys (703-648-4053)
Susan Haseltine, Associate Director for Biology
Dr. Robert C. Szaro, Chief Scientist for Biology (703-648-4048)
Paul Dresler, Program Coordinator, Status and Trends Program
*Dave Pyke (541-750-7334)
Johnnie Burton, Acting Assistant Secretary, Lands and Mineral Management
Kathleen Clarke, Director, BLM (202-208-3801-Lynn Cook)
Ed Shepard, Assistant Director, Renewable Resources and Planning
*Jeff Rawson, Act. Dep.Asst.Dir (202-208-4896)
Rob Roudabush, Acting Div. Chief, Rangeland Resources Division
Jim Hughes, Deputy Director for Policy
*Bob Bolton, Senior Rangeland Management Specialist (202-452-7792)
Matthew J. Hogan, Acting Assistant Secretary, Fish, Wildlife and Parks
H. Dale Hall, Director, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
Elizabeth Stevens, Assistant Director, External Affairs
Steven Kohl, Div International Conservation (703-358-1762)
*Phil Million, Chief, Div Conservation Partnerships (703-358-2521)
*Lory Peramore , Div Conservation Partnerships (703-358-2541)

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

Stephen L. Johnson, Administrator (202-564-1530)
*Jon Scholl, National Agriculture Leader (202-564-7719)
*Tom Wirth, Climate Change Division (202-343-9313)    

U.S. Agency for International Development

*Joyce Turk
*Scott Christiansen, Senior Agricultural Development Officer (202-712-4584)
*Dan Miller
Roger Bloom

The H. John Heinz III Center for Science, Economics and the Environment

Thomas E. Lovejoy, President
Anthony C. Janetos, Vice President (202-737-6307)
*Robin O'Malley, Director, Environmental Reporting Program (202-737-6307)

Ecological Society of America

*Katherine S. McCarter, Executive Director (202-833-8773)
Nadine Lymn, Dir Public Affairs (202-833-8773 ext 205)
*Justin Derner, Rangeland Ecology Section Chair (307-772-2433, ext. 113)
Cluff Duke, Dir Sci Programs (202-833-8773, ext 202)

International Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies

*John Baughman, Executive Vice President (202-624-7890) baughman@
fishwildlife.org replaced by Matt Hogan Sept 2006
Donald MacLauchlan, Intl Res Dir (202-624-3600)
Jennifer Mock, Dir Public Affairs (202-624-7890)
Amber Pairis, Science Research Liaison     

Wildlife Management Institute

Steve Williams, President (202-371-1808 ext 25)
Dick McCabe, EVP (202-371-1808 ext 24)
Len Carpenter, Western Region Representative, Ft. Collins, CO (970-223-1099)

The Nature Conservancy

Louise Milkman (703-841-7426)
*Susan Hicks (703-841-5336)
*Julie Falkner (703-841-7425, 703-731-3891 cell)
Gary Kania, Senior Advisor, Fish and Wildlife Services (703-841-7426)-Left 
TNC
Mike Powelson, Director Agency Relations, NW Division (503-230-1221)
Bruce Runnels, Conservation Regional Director, Rocky Mtn. (970-484-2886)
Joni Ward, Director of Research Programs (307-332-2971)
*Bob Unnasch, Sr. Cons. Sci, Glob. Cons. Approach Team(208-343-8826 WW Ext2)

The World Bank

*Chris Finch (202-458-2348)
Jimmy Smith (202-458-7373)

U.S. Department of Defense
Peter Boice, ODUSD (IE) (703-604-0524)
*Tommy Wright (301-904-9450) since moved to U.S. Forest Service

U.S. Department of Homeland Security
(O'Rourke awaiting contact information from Jason Campbell)

GLCI - Grazing Lands Conservation Initiative
John Peterson - (703-455-4387-home: 703-455-6886 office)

National Academy of Sciences - Agriculture and Natural Resources
Robin Schoen - (202-334-2236)

National Science Foundation - Division of Environmental Biology
Penelope Firth, Director - (703-292-8480)

Society for Conservation Biology
Alan Thornhill, Executive Director - 703-276-2384

APPENDIX S2

Mark Rey, Under Secretary Natural Resources and the EnvironmentUSDA - NRE1400 
Independence AveJamie L. Whitten Bldg. Room 217EWashington, DC 20250	
	Larry ClarkDeputy Chief Science and Technology  USDA - NRCSSouth Ag 
Building - Room 5006-SBox 2890Washington, DC 20013-2890		Bruce 
Knight, ChiefNatural Resources Conservation ServiceUSDA-NRCS1400 Independence 
AveSouth Ag Bldg. Room 5105 A-SWashington, DC 20013 
Pat ShaverUSDA-NRCS1201 NE Lloyd Blvd- Suite 1000Portland, OR 97232 - 1202 	
	Dennis ThompsonUSDA-NRCSNational Range and Grazing Lands Ecologist1400 
Independence Ave.South Ag Bldg - Room 6152Washington, DC 20013. 		Joel 
Holtrop, Deputy ChiefU.S. Forest Service1400 Independence Ave, SWMail Stop 
1106Washington, DC 20250 
U.S. Forest Service, CDale Bosworth201 14th Street, SWMail Stop 
1144Washington, DC 20024 - 1144 		Ann BartuskaUSDA - FS201 14th St. SW - 
Room NWWashington, DC 20250 		Janette KaiserDirector, Forest and 
RangelandsU.S. Forest Service201 14th Street, SW - 3NWWashington, DC 20250 
Jeremy StumpActing Deputy Under SecretaryUSDA1400 Independence Ave. 
SWWashington, DC 20250		Dr. Chuck Lambert, UndersecretaryUSDA1400 
Independence Ave. SW   Room 228W Washington, DC 20250		Rick DunkleUSDA - 
APHIS - PPQ1400 Independence Ave SW         Room 302E Washington, DC 20250
Dr. Ron DeHaven, AdministratorUSDA - APHIS1400 Independence Ave, SW         
Room 312E Washington, DC 20250		John PayneAssistant Deputy 
AdministratorUSDA - APHIS  - PPQ1400 Independence Ave, SWRoom 302EWashington, 
DC 20250		Kelly PorterUSDA - APHIS1400 Independence Ave, SWRoom 
228WWashington, DC 20250 
Osama El-LissyDirector Invasive Species and Pest ManagementUSDA-APHIS-PPQ4700 
River Road - Unit 160Riverdale, MD 20737 		Paul EggertAssociate Deputy 
AdministratorUSDA - APHIS14th and Independence Ave, SWJ.L. Whitten Federal 
Building         Room 302E Washington, DC 20250		Dr. Gale Buchanan, 
Under SecretaryUSDAJ. L. Whitten Federal BuildingRoom 214W1400 Independence 
Ave SWWashington, DC 20250 
Alan TaskerNational Noxious Weed Program ManagerUSDA - APHIS - PPQ4700 River 
Road - Unit 147Riverdale, MD 20737 		Edward B. Knipling, 
AdministratorARS - USDAJ.L. Whitten Federal Building14th and Independence Ave 
SWWashington, DC 20250 		Merle Pierson, Acting Under 
SecretaryUSDAJ.L. Whitten Federal Building 1400 Independence Ave 
SWWashington, DC 20250
Pai - Yei WhungDirector, Office of International Research ProgramsUSDA - 
ARS5601 Sunnyside AveGWCC - BLTSVLBeltsville, MD 20705 		Antoinette 
BetschartAssociate AdministratorUSDA - ARSJ.L. Whitten Federal BuildingRoom 
302E1400 Independence Ave, SWWashington, DC 20250 		Colien Hefferan, 
AdministratorUSDA - CSREESJ.L. Whitten Federal BuildingRoom 305A1400 
Independence Ave, SWMS 2201Washington, DC 20250 - 2201 
Evert ByingtonNational Program Leader - Rangeland, Pasture, ForagesNatural 
Resources and Sustainable Agricultural Systems5601 Sunnyside Ave-.Room 4-
2278Beltsville, MD 20705 - 5140		Dan Kugler, Deputy AdministratorNatural 
Resources and EnvironmentUSDA - CSREES1400 Independence Ave, SWWashington, DC 
20250 - 2210 		Jim DobrowolskiNational Program Leader, RangelandsUSDA 
- CSREES3212 Waterfront CenterWashington, DC 20250 
Bill HoffmanNational Program Leader, Plant and Animal SystemsUSDA - 
CSREES2424 Waterfront CenterWashington, DC 20250		Anthony Janetos, Vice 
PresidentH. John Heinz III Center for Science, Economics and the 
Environment1001 Pennsylvania Ave, NWSuite 735 SouthWashington, DC 20004 	
	Katherine S. McCarterExecutive DirectorEcological Society of America1707 
H. Street, NW - Suite 400Washington, DC 20006 
Robin O'Malley, Program DirectorH. John Heinz III Center for Science, 
Economics and the Environment1001 Pennsylvania Ave, NWSuite 735 
SouthWashington, DC 20004		Matt HoganExecutive Vice 
PresidentAssociation of Fish and Wildlife Agencies444 North Capitol St, NW 
Suite 725Washington, DC 20001		Nadine LymnDirector of Public 
AffairsEcological Society of America1707 H. Street, NW - Suite 400Washington, 
DC 20006
Jennifer MockAgriculture Conservation Policy AnalystAssociation of Fish and 
Wildlife Agencies444 North Capitol St. NWSuite 725Washington, DC 20001	
	Donald MacLauchlanInternational Resource DirectorAssociation of Fish and 
Wildlife Agencies444 North Capitol St, NWSuite 725Washington, DC 20001	
	Len Carpenter4015 Cheney DriveFt. Collins, CO 80526 - 5332
Steven Williams, PresidentWildlife Management Institute1146 19th Street 
NWSuite 700Washington, DC 20036		Louis MilkmanTNC4245 N. Fairfax Drive - 
Suite 100Arlington, VA 22203		Susan Owens, DirectorForeign 
Agriculture ServiceResearch and Scientific Exchange Division1400 Independence 
Ave, SWSouth Ag Building Room 3229Washington, DC 20250 - 1084
Mike PowelsonTNC821 Se 14th AvePortland, OR 97214		Susan 
HicksTNC4245 N. Fairfax Drive - Suite 100Arlington, VA 22203		Joni 
WoodTNC258 Main Street - No. 200Lander, WY 82520
Bruce RunnelsTNC117 East Mountain Ave - Suite 201Ft. Collins, CO 80524		
		Bob UnnaschTNC1109 Main Street, Suite 333Boise ID 83702
Rob RoudabushBLM1849 C. Street NWMS - LS - 201Washington, DC 20240	
	Ed ShepardBLM1849 C. Street, NWMS - LS - 201Washington, DC 20240	
	Bob Bolton BLM1849 C. Street, NWMS - LS - 201Washington, DC 20240
Jim HughesBLM1849 C. Street, NWMS - LS - 201Washington, DC 20240		Dr. P. 
Patrick LeahyActing Director, USGS12201 Sunrise Valley Drive, MS 301Reston, 
VA 20192		Dr. Robert C. SzaroChief Scientist for BiologyUSGS12201 
Sunrise Valley Drive, MS300Reston VA 20192
Susan HaseltineUSGS12201 Sunrise Valley Drive,MS300Reston, VA 20192	
	Jack Waide, Program CoordinatorTerrestrial, Freshwater and Marine 
Ecosystem ProgramUSGS - Biological Resources Discipline12201 Sunrise Valley 
Drive,MS301Reston, VA 20192		Dave PykeUSGS, Forest and Rangeland 
Ecosystems Science Center3200 SW Jefferson WayCorvallis OR 97331
Paul DreslerUSGS12201 Sunrise Valley Drive,MS301Reston, VA 20192		Chris 
FinchThe World Bank1818 H. Street, NWMC - 9 - 909Washington, DC 20433	
	Scott ChristiansenSenior Agricultural Development 
OfficerUSAID/ANE/TS/ENV (AG)1300 Pennsylvania Ave, NWWashington, DC 20523 - 
4900
Tom WirthUS EPAClimate Change Division1310 L. St., NW (MC 6207J)Washington, 
DC 20005		Jon SchollCounselor to the AdministratorEPA1200 Pennsylvania 
Ave NW, Suite 2145ARN MC 1101AWashington, DC 20460		Peter BoiceDoD 
Conservation Team LeaderODUSD (I&E)CO1225 South Clark StreetSuite 
1500Arlington, VA 22202-4336
Bob DrakeNational GLCI ChairP.O. Box 188Davis, OK 73030		John 
PetersonGLCI Volunteer and Conference Manager9304 Lundy CourtBurke, VA 22015-
3431		Alan ThornhillExecutive DirectorSociety for Conservation 
Biology4245 N. Fairfax DriveSuite 400Arlington, VA 22203-1651
Robin SchoenDirectorBoard on Agriculture and Natural ResourcesNational 
Research Council (Keck 686)500 Fifth Street, NWWashington, DC 20001	
	William Y.B. ChangU.S. National Science FoundationBeijing OfficeRoom 
1816 Silver TowerNo. 2, Dong San Huan Bie LuChaoyang DistrictBeijing 
100027P.R. China		Penelope FirthDivision of Environmental BiologyNational 
Science Foundation4201 Wilson Blvd., Room 635Arlington, VA 22230
Sari SoderstromRural Sector CoordinatorThe World Bank Office BeijingLevel 16, 
China World Tower 2China World Trade CenterNo. 1, Jianguomenwai AvenueBeijing 
100004P.R. China		Montague W. DemmentDirector, Global Livestock CRSPUC 
DavisDavis, CA 95616		Irene BainProgram Officer for Environment and 
DevelopmentThe Ford FoundationSuite 501International Club Office Building21 
Jianguomenwai DaijeBeijing 100020P.R. China
Michael BandyAFGC Headquarters350 Poplar AvenueElmhurst. Il 60126	
	John BonnerExecutive Vice PresidentCouncil for Agricultural Science and 
Technology4420 West Lincoln WayAmes, IA 50014-3447		Cal 
BagleyColorado State UniversityUniversity Mail 1490 - CMMLFt. Collins, CO 
80523-1490
Brant KirychukBeijing Project OfficeAgriculture and Agri-Food CanadaSuite 
425-426Grand Pacific Building A8A Guanghua RoadChaoyang DistrictBeijing 
100026P.R. China		Tomi HuszarSecond Secretary (Development)Embassy of 
Canada19 Dongzhimenwai DajieChaoyang DistrictBeijing 100600P.R. China	
	Jason CampbellExecutive Vice PresidentSociety for Range Management10030 
West 27th AveWheat Ridge, CO 80215-6601
Karl GlasenarDirector of Science PolicyASA/CSSA/SSSA900 2nd Street, NESuite 
205Washington, DC 20002		Ellen BergfeldExecutive Vice 
PresidentASA/CSSA/SSSA677 S. Segoe RoadMadison, WI 53711-1086		

APPENDIX S3

AGENDA - IGC/IRC FUNDRAISING, WASHINGTON, DC SEPT. 11 - 16, 2006

(As of Friday, September 15, 2006, 2006)

MONDAY, SPETEMBER 11
8:00  -  JOHN BAUGHMAN  -  International Fish and Wildlife Agencies, 444 
North Capitol Street, NW, Suite 725, 202-624-7890

9:00  -  SUSAN OWENS, FOREIGN AG SERVICE, USDA South Bldg Room 3229, 202-690-
4872, (Andrew White)

11:00-  MARK REY, - J.L. Whitten Bldg Room 217E, 202-720-7173 (Yvette)

1:00  -  U.S.F.S. - JANETTE KAISER, 201 14th Street, 202-205-1185

3:00  -  EPA  -  JON SCHOLL, Council to the Administrator/ National 
Agricultural Leader (Beth is Jon's Deputy), EPA, 1200 Pennsylvania Ave, NW, 
Suite 2415, 202-564-1530 (Georgia Bednar 202-564-9816)

4:30  PENELOPE FIRTH (Director) - National Science Foundation - Division of 
Environmental Biology , 4201 Wilson Boulevard, Arlington, 635N, 703-292-8480

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12

8:00  -  LARRY CLARK, DENNIS THOMPSON  -  NRCS - Deputy Chief Science and 
Technology and National Range and Grazing Land Ecologist, South Ag Building, 
Room 5006-S (Larry), Room 6152 (Dennis), 202-720-4630 (Larry), 202-720-5010 
(Dennis)

9:30  -  GLCI - JOHN PETERSON - MEET AT LARRY CLARK'S OFFICE

11:30 -  STEVE WILLIAMS - President, WILDLIFE MGMT. INST. - LUNCH - 1146 19th 
Street, NW, Suite 700, 202-371-1808 ext 25 

1:00  -  COLIEN HEFFERAN (ADMIN), DAN KUGLER (Dept. Admin Natural Resources 
and Environment) and Jim Dobrowolski (National Program Leader for 
Rangeland/Grassland Ecosystems) - CSREES - J.L. Whitten Room 305-A, 202-720-
4423

3:30  -  PETER BOICE, Conservation Team Leader  -  DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE, 
1225 South Clark Street, Crystal City (See detailed instructions on how to 
get there from Peter's email with O'Rourke) 703-604-0524

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 13
9:30  -  HEINZ CENTER  -  ROBIN O'MALLEY, 1001 Pennsylvania Ave NW, Suite 735 
South, 202-737-6307
11:00  -  Society for Conservation Biology - Alan Thornhill, 4245 North 
Fairfax Drive, Suite 400, Arlington, 703-276-2384

1:30    -   THE NATURE CONSERVANCY - JULIE FALKNER (703-841-7425, 703-731-
3891 cell), SUSAN HICKS (703-841-5336), LOUISE MILKMAN (703-841-7426), 4245 
N. Fairfax Drive, Suite 100, Arlington

2:15  -  NCBA/PLC - Stacey Katseanes, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave., SW, Suite 300, 
202-347-0228

3:30    -   BLM  -  KATHLEEN CLARK, Director, ED SHEPPARD, ROB ROUDABUSH, JIM 
HUGHES, BOB BOLTON  - 1849 C St. NW,  ROOM 5653, 202-208-3801 (Lynn Cook)

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 14
9:00  -  ESA  -  KATHERINE MCCARTER(EVP),CLIFF DUKE(DIR OF SCI.), NADINE LYMM 
(Dir Public Affairs), JUSTIN DERNER(Chair - Rangeland Section), 1707 H. 
Street, NW, Suite 400, 202-833-8773

10:00  -  UNEP - Clayton Adams (Team Assistant)/ Ashbindu Singh, 1707 H. 
Street, NW, Suite 300, 202-785-0456

11:00 -  CHRIS FINCH  -  WORLD BANK, 1818 H Street NW Room MC 9-229, 202-458-
2348 (YINGNAN JIA)

1:00 - USAID - SCOTT CHRISTIANSEN, JOYCE TURK, DAN MILLER, Ronald Reagan 
Building, 14th Street Entrance, 202-712-4584

3:00 -  USFWS - STEVEN KOHL (Division of International Conservation), LAURY 
PERAMORE (Division of Conservation Partnerships) - 4401 North Fairfax Drive, 
Arlington,  ROOM 725, 703-358-1762 (Steve), 703-358-2541 Laury)

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 15

8:30 -  National Academy of Sciences - Agriculture and Natural Resources - 
ROBIN SCHOEN (Director) - 500 Fifth Street, NW, Suite 686 - 202-334-2236

11:30  -  TRI SOCIETIES - Karl Glasener  -  met for lunch

1:30  -  APHIS  -  JOHN PAYNE, PAUL EGGERT, ALAN TASKER, OSAMA EL-LISSY, 
KELLY PORTER, 1400 Independence Ave SW Room 302E, 202-720-5601 (Chauncey 
Robertson)

3:00  -  ARS  -  DR. ED KNIPLING (Administrator), EV BYINGTON (National 
Program Leader Rangeland, Pasture and Forages), PAI-YEI WHUNG (Director 
Office of International Research Programs)  - 1400 Independence Ave, SW,  
ROOM 302A, 202-720-3656 (Kathy Lonaberger)

APPENDIX S4

March   , 2006

Dear           :

In late June - early July, 2008 the International Rangeland Congress and the 
International Grassland Congress are combining resources to hold the first 
ever joint Congress between the two organizations.  This Congress will be 
held in Hohhot, Inner Mongolia, People's Republic of China. We enclose the 
first brochure announcing this Congress.

This Congress will bring together at least 1000 rangeland/grassland workers 
from around the world to discuss research, management and policy issues.  In 
addition, we expect at least 500 Chinese grassland/rangeland workers to 
attend.  Pre-congress tours and Mid-congress tours will take Congress 
delegates into ecosystems very familiar to your employees.  The benefit to 
your organization will be how management systems have changed those 
vegetation communities and how plants such as crested wheatgrass, native to 
China but introduced to the U.S., are managed in those systems.  The value of 
the network of contacts your employees can make is without measure.

Professor Hong Fuzeng, the Chair of the Chinese Organizing Committee for this 
Congress will be in Washington, D.C. the week of June 5 - 9, 2006 and would 
like to meet with you.  Professor Hong is the "grandfather" of grassland 
management in China.  We will accompany Professor Hong and will have Chinese 
translation available.  With these two Congresses meeting together we have 
considerable need for outside support for publishing of proceedings, 
conducting mid-congress tours, and assisting as many delegates from 
developing nations to attend the congress as possible.  We do not make a 
profit on these congresses but rather try to put the majority of the 
registration receipts and sponsorships into developing country delegate 
support.  Professor Hong would like to visit with you about the                                            
assisting in the sponsorship of this Congress.  It is worth noting that with 
these Congresses meeting together it will not be until the year 2011 that the 
International Rangeland Congress holds its next Congress and 2013 that the 
International Grassland Congress holds its next Congress.

We look forward to seeing you in early June,               , to discuss these 
possibilities with you.  Dr. Karl Glasener, Science Policy Advisor for the 
Tri-Societies (Agronomy/Crops/Soils), will be calling you soon to set an 
appointment during the week of June 5 - 9, 2006.

Sincerely yours,

James T. O'Rourke                                                   Vivien G. 
Allen
President, International Rangeland Congresses        Past Chair, 
International Grassland 
Congresses               

APPENDIX S5

July 7, 2006

Dale Bosworth, Chief
U.S. Forest Service
201 14th Street, SW
Mail Stop 1144
Washington, DC 20024 - 1144

Dear Dale:

I want to thank you for the very fruitful meeting you and your staff had with 
my colleagues concerning support for the International 
Grassland/International Rangeland Congress to be held in Hohhot, Inner 
Mongolia, China from June 29 - July 5, 2008.  I am deeply sorry that I could 
not have been with you all.  Double abdominal surgeries were not pleasant 
alternatives.

I understand that there were several questions that could not be answered for 
you at that time and for that reason I would like to schedule a meeting with 
you and/or your staff during the week of September 11 - 15, 2006.  At that 
time I will have answers for you on the following issues: 

a.	The detailed overall budget for the Congress
b.	The preliminary Program
c.	What various levels of sponsorship "buys" an organization

I would also like to discuss with you and/or your staff what role the Forest 
Service would like to play in the Congress.  I have had discussions with 
Jannette Kaiser and Dennis Childs from Colorado State University on the 
interest of holding a symposium/workshop on Sustainable Rangelands.  I would 
also like to include Ann Bartuska in our meetings to determine what level of 
activity the research branch would like to play.  We would, of course, also 
like to see the Forest Service have a display in the Trade Show.

With a goal of $350,000 that the Chinese Organizing Committee has set for 
overseas sponsorship, and realistically thinking that over half of this would 
need to come from the U.S., this leaves us with a goal of approximately 
$30,000 from each of the seven major agencies playing a role in 
rangelands/grasslands in the U.S. and with international 
interests/responsibilities (USFS, APHIS, NRCS, BLM, ARS, CSREES, and USGS).  
I would like to visit with you and/or your staff about what level of support 
you might be able to commit to at this time as well as the possibilities of 
end-of-year 2007 funds and 2008 budgeted monies that we might explore.  In 
the past we have channeled funds from agencies through an account we hold 
with the Society for Range Management in Denver, Colorado.  We can provide 
those details during our meetings.

Jason Campbell, the Executive Vice President of the Society for Range 
Management, will be contacting you to set up a meeting date and time for the 
week of September 11 - 15, 2006.  I look forward to visiting with you at that 
time, hoping to keep the surgeons at bay.

Sincerely yours,

James T. O'Rourke, President
International Rangeland Congresses

CC.	Joel Holtrop
Jannette Kaiser
Ann Bartuska

APPENDIX 6

James T. O'Rourke, President
International Rangeland Congress
61 Country Club Road
Chadron, NE 69337
Tele: 308-432-5954
FAX: 308-432-6369
Email: jorourke@csc.edu

March 28, 2007

Joel Holtrop, Deputy Chief
U.S. Forest Service
1400 Independence Ave, SW
Mail Stop 1106
Washington, DC 20250

Dear Joel:

I want to thank you for your sponsorship of the 2008 International Grassland 
and International Rangeland Congress to be held in Hohhot, Inner Mongolia 
June 29 - July 5.  Because of that sponsorship I want to keep you abreast of 
the activity of the Congress.

I am enclosing a copy of the Second Announcement which, most importantly, 
includes the Call for Papers.  You will also find information on the Trade 
Show/Exhibits, Tours (Pre-congress, Post-congress and Mid-congress), 
Workshops and Delegate Sponsorship.  You will also find your organization 
listed in the Sponsoring Organizations.

We would appreciate your bringing this Congress information to the attention 
of all of your employees.  Realizing that this Second Announcement is a bit 
long to be included in total in a newsletter or other such vehicle you use to 
send out information to employees of the organization we would appreciate it 
if you could remind them to look at the website www.IGC-IRC2008.org and if 
you could also post the summary of that Second Announcement, which I also 
enclose here, in your newsletter, email flashes, etc., any of which may reach 
the employees or partners of your organization.

Thanks again for your tremendous support for the Congress.  We look forward 
to seeing you in Hohhot.

Sincerely yours,

James T. O'Rourke

APPENDIX 7

September 25, 2006

Janette Kaiser
Forest and Rangeland Management 
U.S. Forest Service
1400 Independence Ave., SW
MS 1103
Washington, DC 20250-1103

Dear Janette:

I want to thank you and the Range Management staff for meeting with us on 
September 11, 2006 concerning the joint International Grassland/ 
International Rangeland Congress to be held in Hohhot, Inner Mongolia from 29 
June to 5 July 2008.  I want you to know that yours is the first, and 
largest, agreement that we have in hand.  I would also like to follow up on 
the conversations that we had to see where we go from here. 

Ron Keil had the agreement ready for us before I left town that week, Jason 
Campbell signed it to allow funds to be transferred to our account at the 
Society for Range Management in Wheat Ridge, Colorado, and I have a copy of 
the agreement in hand.  When do you expect that transfer of funds to take 
place?

I also have the draft proposal that you provided for me on the day of our 
meeting, as well as the earlier abstract of the symposium that Dennis Child 
prepared some time ago, for the symposium and pre congress workshop that you 
have in mind.  Last week Dennis called me and he brought me up to date on the 
effort that he has ongoing in Inner Mongolia with range scientists there and 
the background for the proposed pre congress workshop and symposium.  He has 
a proposal before the World Bank to fund part of his work and as I will be 
meeting with the World Bank while I am in Beijing in early November he is 
going to prepare a large packet of information for me to allow me to 
encourage the Bank to fund this activity, which is the basis, along with the 
work of the Sustainable Rangeland Roundtable, for your pre congress workshop 
and symposium.  It look to me like the stage is set for a very successful 
workshop and symposium at the 2008 congress.

Again let me thank you for the enthusiasm you have shown for this event.  
Please let me know what I need to do next from my end to assist.

Sincerely yours,

James T. O'Rourke

APPENDIX S8

Washington DC Hotels - IGC/IRC Fundraising - June 4 - 11, 2006

1.	Days Inn  - Silver Spring  -  5 blocks from Silver Spring Metro  $75.00

2.	Super 8 Washington Downtown DC  -10 minute walk from metro ( I think the 
New York Ave/Florida Ave/Gallaudet College Metro)  -  $90

3.	Gallery Inn  -  3 blocks from Dupont Circle Metro - $90 (Note:  I was 
not very impressed with the manger of the hotel whom I talked to)

4.	Adams Inn - 7 blocks to Woodley Park Zoo Metro - $95

5.	Kolorama Guest House - 4 ½ blocks from Woodley Park Zoo Metro - $120  
(Note: This is a guest house which closes its doors at 10:00 PM - She would 
put us all in one guest house)

6.	Windsor Park Hotel - 1 block from Woodley Park Zoo Metro - $127

7.	Connecticut Avenue Days Inn - 1 ½ blocks from Van Ness/UDC Metro - $139

8.	Channel Inn - 5 blocks from L'Enfant Plaza Metro - 7 blocks from 
National Mall - $139

9.	Holiday Inn Alexandria  Telegraph Hill - 1 block from Eisenhower Metro - 
$142